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A little while ago I received an email from Deborah asking what formula she can use to list missing numbers from a range.

Here is Deborah’s list of numbers:

You’ll notice they’re not sorted and there is a blank cell in the middle of the range. So, our formula needs to be able to handle blanks and an unsorted list.

And here she is:

=

SMALL(

IF(

COUNTIF($A$1:$A$7,ROW($1:$12)

)=0,ROW($1:$12),"")

,

ROW(A1))

It’s an array formula so you need to enter it with CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.

Below you can see the results of the formula copied down column C. When there are no more missing numbers it returns a #NUM! error.

Tip: You can easily avoid the #NUM! errors by wrapping it in an IFERROR function if you prefer.

Count the numbers in the range A1:A7, that match the numbers generated by ROW($1:$12) i.e. {1;2;3;4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12}, if they = 0 (i.e. if they’re missing), give me a list of them, if they’re not = 0 (i.e. not missing), give me “” (i.e. nothing), and in this cell just return the 1st smallest missing value.

The cell reference in the ROW(A1) part of the formula is relative, so as you copy the formula down column C, ROW(A1) becomes ROW(A2) which =2 and returns the second smallest missing number, ROW(A3) which is 3, returns the third smallest missing number and so on.

Functions Used in this Formula

SMALL

The SMALL function returns the smallest kth value in an array. e.g the first smallest, second smallest, third smallest and so on.

The syntax is SMALL(array,k)

ROW

This ROW formula: ROW(A1) returns the row number of a reference. In this case it would return 1.

This ROW formula: ROW($1:$12) returns an array of values from 1 to 12 like this {1;2;3;4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12}. It works this way because this is an array formula entered with CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.

COUNTIF

The COUNTIF function is counting the numbers in the range A1:A7 that match the array of values returned by the ROW function {1;2;3;4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12}.

The syntax is: COUNTIF(range, criteria)

IF

The IF function tests for counts of 0, and if TRUE i.e. zero (remember if the count is zero it means the number is missing), it then returns the corresponding value from the resultant array generated by ROW($1:$12) i.e. {1;2;3;4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12}, otherwise it returns nothing.

The syntax is: IF(logical_test, value_if_true, value_if_false)

Let’s Step Through How It Evaluates:

The key here is that array formulas evaluate on an array of items i.e. more than one item, within the one formula. Below you will see evidence of this as the formula evaluates.

=

SMALL(

IF(

COUNTIF($A$1:$A$7,ROW($1:$12)

)

=0,ROW($1:$12),"")

,ROW(A1))

Step 1 – The values in the range A1:A7 and ROW(1:12) are returned:

=

SMALL(

IF(

COUNTIF({1;7;5;8;;10;12},{1;2;3;4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12})

=0,ROW($1:$12),"")

,ROW(A1))

Step 2 – The COUNTIF then returns (a resultant array of) the counts of values in the array returned by the ROW(1:12) formula that are present in the range A1:A7:

=

SMALL(

IF(

{1;0;0;0;1;0;1;1;0;1;0;1}

)=0, ROW($1:$12),"")

,ROW(A1))

i.e. in the range A1:A7 there is 1 number 1 in the range, there are 0 number 2’s, 0 number 3’s etc.

Step 3 – The IF function’s logical test evaluates returning a TRUE where the number in the resultant array =0, and a FALSE where it doesn’t:

=

SMALL(

IF(

{FALSE;TRUE;TRUE;TRUE;FALSE;TRUE;FALSE;FALSE;TRUE;FALSE;TRUE;FALSE}

, {1;2;3;4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12},"")

,ROW(A1))

Step 4 – the IF function’s value_if_true and value_if_false evaluate:

=

SMALL(

{"";2;3;4; "";6;"";"";9; "";11;""}

,ROW(A1))

We now have a resultant array of the missing numbers.

Step 5 – The final ROW function evaluates to 1:

=

SMALL(

{"";2;3;4; "";6;"";"";9; "";11;""}

,1)

Step 6 – the SMALL function finds the 1st smallest value in the array:

=

2

Tip: the ROW function is used as a short cut to avoid having to type in an array constant. i.e. it’s quicker to type ROW($1:$12) than it is to type {1;2;3;4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12}

Note: This formula will ignore duplicate values in the list since it’s only looking for numbers in the range that have a count of 0, i.e. are missing.

Limitations of This Formula:

It uses the ROW function to generate a list of values that should be in Deborah’s range. It is therefore limited to the number of rows in your workbook. If you’re using Excel 2003 you’re limited to numbers in the range 1 to 65,536, and if you’re using Excel 2007 onwards you’re limited to number between 1 and 1,048,576.

It only works with whole numbers/integers.

Here is a clever VBA solution to find missing numbers that gets around some of the limitations above, plus the added bonus of allowing you to choose whether you want your list of missing values returned in a vertical or horizontal list.

Formula Challenge

What if your sequence of numbers were all negative. What formula would you use to find the missing negative numbers?

Thanks

I’d like to thank Deborah for asking this question. It reminded me that I should write about this formula.

I’d also like to thank Oscar Cronquist of Get Digital Help for sharing his formula.

You're reading Excel Formula – List Missing Numbers In A Sequence

Int In Excel (Formula, Examples)

INT in Excel

INT in Excel is a very simple function used to convert any number into an integer value. Integer values are any number that is a whole number but can be a positive or negative number. Int function can consider any number, whether it is a decimal, fraction, or square root value, but in the end, we will be getting a whole number out of it.

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INT Formula in Excel:

Below is the INT Formula in Excel.

where

How to Use INT Function in Excel?

INT function in Excel is very simple and easy to use. Let us understand the working of the INT function in Excel by some INT Formula examples. INT function can be used as a worksheet function and VBA function.

You can download this INT Function Excel Template here – INT Function Excel Template

Example #1

The below-mentioned table contains a value in cell “C8”, i.e. 6.79, which is a positive number; I need to find out the nearest integer for 6.79 using the INT function in Excel.

Select the cell “E8,” where the INT function needs to be applied.

A dialog box appears where arguments (number) for the INT function need to be filled or entered.

i.e. =INT(C8).

It removes the decimal from the number and returns the integer part of the number, i.e. 6.

Example #2

The below-mentioned table contains a value in cell “C14”, i.e. -5.89, which is a negative number; I need to find out the nearest integer for -5.89 using the INT function in Excel. Select cell E14, where the INT function needs to be applied.

A dialog box appears where arguments (number) for the INT function need to be filled or entered.

i.e. =INT(C14)

It removes the decimal from the number and returns the integer part of the number, i.e. -6.

Example #3

In the below mention example, I have the date of birth ( 16th May 1982) in cell “J8” I need to calculate the age in cell “L8” using the INT function in Excel.

Before the INT function in Excel, let’s know about the YEARFRAC function; the YEARFRAC function returns a decimal value representing fractional years between two dates. I.e. Syntax is =YEARFRAC (start_date, end_date, [basis]). It returns the number of days between 2 dates as a year.

Here the INT function is integrated with the YEARFRAC function in cell “L8”.

YEARFRAC formula takes the date of birth and the current date (given by the TODAY function) and returns the output value as age in years.

i.e. =INT(YEARFRAC(J8,TODAY()))

It returns the output value i.e. 36 years.

Example #4

Usually, Excel stores the date value as a number, considering the date as an integer and the time as a decimal portion. If a cell contains a date and time as a combined value, you can only extract the date value using the INT function in Excel. Cell “P8” contains the date and time as a combined value. Here I need to extract the date value in cell “R8.”

Select the cell R8 where the INT function needs to be applied.

i.e. =INT(P8)

It removes a decimal portion from the date & time value and returns only the date portion as a number, where we need to discard the fraction value by formatting in the output value.

i.e. 11/12/18

Example #5

The below-mentioned table contains a value less than 1 in cell “H13”, i.e. 0.70, which is a positive number; I need to find out the nearest integer for decimal value, i.e. 0.70, using the INT function in Excel. Select cell I13 where the INT function needs to be applied.

A dialog box appears where arguments (number) for the INT function need to be filled or entered.

i.e. =INT(H13)

Here, it removes the decimal from the number and returns the integer part of the number, i.e. 0

Things to Remember

In the INT function, Positive numbers are rounded toward 0, while negative numbers are rounded away from 0. E.G. =INT(2.5) returns 2 and =INT(-2.5) returns -3.

Both INT() and TRUNC() functions are similar when applied to positive numbers; both can convert a value to its integer portion.

If any wrong type of argument is entered in the function’s syntax, it results in #VALUE! Error.

If the referred cell is not a valid or invalid reference in the INT function, it will return or result in #REF! Error.

#NAME? Error occurs when Excel does not recognize specific text in the formula of the INT function.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to INT Function in Excel. Here we discuss the INT Formula in Excel and how to use the INT function in Excel, along with practical examples and downloadable Excel templates. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

Count In Excel (Formula, Examples)

What is COUNT in Excel?

The COUNT in Excel is a function that counts the number of cells that consists of numeric values in a selected range and ignores all the other entries in the range. For example, the formula “=COUNT(A6:A20)” counts all the cells with numerical values (code number) in the cell range A6:A20, which corresponds to 7.

The COUNT function counts numeric values, including the date, time, percentages, negative numbers, formulas, and fractions.

Key Highlights

The COUNT in Excel is a completely programmed function that can be used for an array

The COUNT function family has a total of five variants- COUNT, COUNTIF, COUNTIFS, COUNTA, and COUNTBLANK

To count logical values, we use the COUNTA variant of the COUNT function family

To count numbers meeting certain criteria, we use either COUNTIF or COUNTIFS function in Excel

The function COUNT in Excel does not count formula errors and logical values

The COUNT function counts dates, too, as Microsoft Excel stores the dates as serial numbers

The function COUNT in Excel does not count the logical values- TRUE or FALSE

COUNT in Excel Syntax:

The syntax for the COUNT Function in Excel is-

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Explanation:

Value1: A required argument of the COUNT function indicates the first item or cell of the specified range.

Value2: It is an optional argument of the COUNT function in Excel that denotes the second set of cells or ranges we wish to count. Once we put the first Value1, all other values become optional.

Note: We can provide up to 256 values to the COUNT function.

The return of the COUNT function is always either zero or greater than zero.

How to use the COUNT in Excel?

Consider the examples below to understand how we can use the function COUNT in Excel.

You can download this COUNT in Excel Template here – COUNT in Excel Template

Example #1

Solution:

Step 1: Place the cursor in cell C7 and enter the formula,

=COUNT(A6:A20)

The above formula will count the numeric values in the given list, as shown below.

Step 2: Press the Enter key to get the below result

The selected range contains 15 values, but the COUNT function in Excel only counts the numerical values and ignores everything else. As a result, it returns 4 as the total number of numerical codes.

Example #2

The table below shows a list of dates. We want to count the total dates using the COUNT in Excel function.

Solution:

Step 1: Place the cursor in cell C8 and enter the formula,

=COUNT(A6:A12)

Step 2: Press the Enter key to get the below result,

The total number of selected cells is seven, but the COUNT function returned the value 5 because two dates in the given list are written in an incorrect format.

The below image shows the dates with incorrect format (highlighted in RED)

Example #3

The table below shows the IDs of five employees, as well as their wages and attendance for the first week of January 2023. If an employee is present, his attendance is marked as 1; if absent, his attendance is marked as A. We want to use the COUNT function in Excel to calculate the Employee’s total wages based on his weekly attendance.

Solution:

Step 1: Place the cursor in cell J6 and enter the formula,

=COUNT(C2:I2)

Step 2: Press the Enter key to get the Total no. of Paid Days as shown below

The COUNT in Excel function returns the Total no. of Paid Days as 6.

Now,

Step 3:  Place the cursor in cell K2 and enter the formula,

=B6/7*J6

Step 4: Press the Enter key to get the Total Wages of the week for Empl ID 1005

Step 5: Follow the same steps to get the Total wages for all the Emp IDs to get the below result

COUNT in Excel with IF condition

Syntax-

=IF(logical_test,[value_if_true],[value_if_false])

Example #4

Consider the above example of employees with IDs, wages, and weekly attendance. Using the COUNT and IF functions, we want to find eligible employees for Full Payment.

Solution:

Step 1: Place the cursor in cell L2 and enter the formula,

=IF (COUNT(C6:I6)=7,” Full Pay”, “Not Full Pay”)

COUNT(C6:I6): There are 7 working days in the week. Therefore, an employee present on all the days will be eligible for Full Payment.

Thus, the condition is written as COUNT(C6:I6)=7

Step 2: Press the Enter key to get the below result

Now,

Step 3: Enter the same formula in the remaining cells to get the below output

Combined with the IF condition, the COUNT function shows that only the person with Emp ID- 1D006 is eligible for Full Payment. Since all other employees were absent on one or the other day that week, they are not eligible for full payment.

Difference Between COUNT and COUNTA

The function COUNT in Excel counts the number of cells having numeric values within a cell range, whereas the COUNTA function counts the number of non-empty or blank cells within a given range.

The function COUNT in Excel counts numeric values and dates, whereas the function COUNTA counts all the cells within a range irrespective of the data type.

Syntax of COUNTA function is-

=COUNTA (value1, [value2], …)

Difference between COUNT and COUNTA with Example

The table below shows 10 rows with 6 numeric codes, 2 non-numeric codes, and 2 blank cells.

The COUNT function counts the number of cells with numeric codes and gives the result of 6.

The COUNTA function counts all the cells having codes, excludes the empty cells, and gives the result of 9.

Things to Remember

Only numerical values are counted in the COUNT function.

The COUNT function ignores empty cells, text and string values, and error values in the array.

If the COUNT function is applied to an empty range of cells, the result will always be zero.

If a text follows the number, COUNT ignores that value also. For example, =COUNT (“145 Number”) would return the result as 0.

If logical values such as TRUE or FALSE are supplied to the formula, the COUNT function will count these logical values.

The result will be zero if the same TRUE or FALSE is supplied in a range.

If you want the count of all the values in the given range, use COUNTA, which counts whatever comes it’s way.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Q1) How do I count cells in Excel?

Answer: In Excel, we can count cells using any of the COUNT function variants: COUNT, COUNTA, COUNTIF, and COUNTBLANK.

COUNT: To count cells with numeric values

COUNTA: To count non-empty cells

COUNTBLANK: To count blank or empty cells

COUNTIF: To count cells meeting specified criteria

Q2) What is the significance of the COUNT function in MS Excel Class 9?

Answer: We can use the COUNT() function to sum or add the number of cells that contain numbers in the specified cell. The count function can perform the complex calculation of adding numbers in a large data set, thus saving time and effort.

Q3) What is the main difference between COUNT and Countif?

The COUNT in Excel function counts the number of cells containing numeric data or entries, whereas the COUNTIF function counts the number of cells meeting the given criteria.

For example, the table below shows students’ Maths marks out of 50. Here, we use the COUNTIF function to count the number of students who have scored more than or equal to 35 and passed the test.

Recommended Articles

The above article is EDUCBA’s guide on using the function COUNT in Excel. For more information related to Excel formulas and functions, EDUCBA recommends the below articles.

Excel Search A Cell For A List Of Words

A while back Vernon asked me how he could search one cell and compare it to a list of words. If any of the words in the list existed then return the matching word.

Ugh, I’ve written that 3 times and I’m not sure it’s any clearer…let’s look at an example.

I’ve highlighted the matching words in column A red.

What we want Excel to do is to check the text string in column A to see if any of the words in our list in H1:H3 are present, if they are then return the matching word. Note: I’ve given cells H1:H3 the named range ‘list’.

There are a few ways we can tackle this so let’s take a look at our options.

Update: It’s easier and more robust to use Power Query to search for text strings, including case and non-case sensitive searches.

Non-Case Sensitive Matching

If you aren’t worried about case sensitive matches then you can use the SEARCH function with INDEX, SUMPRODUCT and ISNUMBER like this:

SEARCH cell A2 to see if it contains any words listed in cells H1:H3 (i.e. the named range ‘list’) and return the number of the character in cell A2 where the word starts. Our formula becomes:

=INDEX(list,SUMPRODUCT(

ISNUMBER(

{20;#VALUE!;#VALUE!}

)

*ROW($1:$3)))

i.e. in cell A2 the ‘F’ in the word ‘Finance’ starts in position 20.

Now using ISNUMBER test to see if the SEARCH formula returns any numbers (if it does it means there is a match). ISNUMBER will return TRUE if there is a number and FALSE if not (this gives us a list of Boolean TRUE or FALSE values). Our formula becomes:

=INDEX(list,SUMPRODUCT(

{TRUE;FALSE;FALSE}

*

ROW($1:$3)

))

Use the ROW function to return an array of numbers {1;2;3} (see notes below on why I’ve used ROW in this formula). Our formula becomes:

=INDEX(list,SUMPRODUCT(

{TRUE;FALSE;FALSE}

*

{1;2;3}

))

When you multiply Boolean TRUE/FALSE values they become their numeric equivalents i.e. TRUE = 1 and FALSE = 0. So our formula evaluates this ({TRUE;FALSE;FALSE}*{1;2;3}) like so: {1*1, 0*2, 0*3} and our formula becomes:

=INDEX(list,SUMPRODUCT(

{1;0;0}

))

SUMPRODUCT simply sums the values {1+0+0} which gives us 1. Note: by using SUMPRODUCT we are avoiding the need for an array formula that requires CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER. Our formula becomes:

=

INDEX(list,

1

)

Index can now go ahead and return the 1st value in the range of cells H1:H3 which is ‘Finance’.

Note: the above formula will not work if a match isn’t found. If you want to return an error if a match isn’t found then you can use this variation:

Not as elegant, is it? In which case you might prefer one of the array formulas below.

Notes about the ROW Function:

The ROW function simply returns the row number of a reference. e.g. ROW(A2) would return 2. When used in an array formula it will return an array of numbers. e.g. ROW(A2:A4) will return {2;3;4}. We can also give just the row reference(s) to the ROW function like so ROW(2:4).

In this formula we have used ROW to simply return an array of values {1;2;3} that represent the items in our ‘list’ i.e. Finance is 1, Construction is 2 and Safety is 3. Alternatively we could have typed {1;2;3} direct in our formula, or even referenced the named range like this ROW(list).

So you see using the ROW function is just a quick and clever way to generate an array of numbers.

What you must bear in mind when using the ROW function for this purpose is that we need a list of numbers from 1 to 3 because there are 3 words in our list and we’re trying to find the position of the matching word.

In this example the formula; ROW(list) will also work because our list happens to start on row 1 but if we were to start ‘list’ on row 2 we would come unstuck because ROW(list) would return {2;3;4} i.e. ‘list’ would actually reference cells H2:H4.

So, don’t get confused into thinking the ROW part of the formula is simply referencing the list or range of cells where the list is, the important point is that the ROW formula returns an array of numbers and we’re using those numbers to represent the number of rows in the ‘list’ which must always start with 1.

Functions Used

INDEX

SEARCH or FIND

ISNUMBER

SUMPRODUCT

ROW – Explained above.

Case Sensitive Matching

[updated Dec 5, 2013]

If your search is case sensitive then you not only need to replace SEARCH with FIND, but you also need to introduce an IF formula like so:

Unfortunately it’s not as simple or elegant as the first non-case sensitive search. Instead the array formulas below are nicer

Array Formula Options

Below are some array formula options to achieve the same result. They use LARGE instead of SUMPRODUCT, and as a result you need to enter these by pressing CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.

Non-case Sensitive:

[updated Dec 5, 2013]

=INDEX(list,LARGE(IF(ISNUMBER(SEARCH(list,A2)),ROW($1:$3)),1)) Press CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER

Case sensitive:

[updated Dec 5, 2013]

=INDEX(list,LARGE(IF(ISNUMBER(FIND(list,A2)),ROW($1:$3)),1)) Press CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER

Download

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Thanks

Special thanks to Roberto for suggesting the ‘updated’ formulas above.

How To Convert Numbers To Words In Indian Rupees In Excel?

When we need to convert numbers to words in Indian rupees in Excel, it can be a time‑consuming process if we do it manually as we need to type the large numbers. We can complete this time-consuming process much more quickly by using the VBA application. Even though the VBA code will be lengthy, we can use this process if there are many values to convert. Read this tutorial to learn how to convert numbers to words in Indian rupees in Excel.

Converting Numbers to Words in Indian Rupees in Excel

Here we will create a new VBA module, then use the formula to get any one of the results, and use the auto-fill handle to get all the results. Let us see a simple process to know how we can convert numbers to words in Indian rupees in Excel.

Step 1

Consider an Excel sheet with a list of numbers, similar to the image below.

Step 2

Then, as shown in the image below, type the following programme into the text box.

Program Public Function RupeeFormat(SNum As String) 'Update By Nirmal Dim xDPInt As Integer Dim xArrPlace As Variant Dim xRStr_Paisas As String Dim xNumStr As String Dim xF As Integer Dim xTemp As String Dim xStrTemp As String Dim xRStr As String Dim xLp As Integer xArrPlace = Array("", "", " Thousand ", " Lacs ", " Crores ", " Trillion ", "", "", "", "") On Error Resume Next If SNum = "" Then RupeeFormat = "" Exit Function End If xNumStr = Trim(Str(SNum)) If xNumStr = "" Then RupeeFormat = "" Exit Function End If xRStr = "" xLp = 0 RupeeFormat = "Digit excced Maximum limit" Exit Function End If xDPInt = InStr(xNumStr, ".") If (Len(xNumStr) - xDPInt) = 1 Then xRStr_Paisas = RupeeFormat_GetT(Left(Mid(xNumStr, xDPInt + 1) & "0", 2)) xRStr_Paisas = RupeeFormat_GetT(Left(Mid(xNumStr, xDPInt + 1), 2)) End If xNumStr = Trim(Left(xNumStr, xDPInt - 1)) End If xF = 1 xTemp = Right(xNumStr, 2) Else If (Len(xNumStr) = 2) Then xTemp = Right(xNumStr, 2) ElseIf (Len(xNumStr) = 1) Then xTemp = Right(xNumStr, 1) Else xTemp = Right(xNumStr, 3) End If End If xStrTemp = "" xStrTemp = RupeeFormat_GetH(Right(xTemp, 3), xLp) xLp = xLp + 1 End If xStrTemp = RupeeFormat_GetT(Right(xTemp, 2)) ElseIf Val(xTemp) < 10 Then xStrTemp = RupeeFormat_GetD(Right(xTemp, 2)) End If xRStr = xStrTemp & xArrPlace(xF) & xRStr End If If xF = 2 Then If Len(xNumStr) = 1 Then xNumStr = "" Else xNumStr = Left(xNumStr, Len(xNumStr) - 2) End If ElseIf xF = 3 Then xNumStr = Left(xNumStr, Len(xNumStr) - 2) Else xNumStr = "" End If ElseIf xF = 4 Then xNumStr = "" Else If Len(xNumStr) <= 2 Then xNumStr = "" Else xNumStr = Left(xNumStr, Len(xNumStr) - 3) End If End If xF = xF + 1 Loop If xRStr = "" Then xRStr = "No Rupees" Else xRStr = " Rupees " & xRStr End If xRStr_Paisas = " and " & xRStr_Paisas & " Paisas" End If RupeeFormat = xRStr & xRStr_Paisas & " Only" End Function Function RupeeFormat_GetH(xStrH As String, xLp As Integer) Dim xRStr As String If Val(xStrH) < 1 Then RupeeFormat_GetH = "" Exit Function Else xStrH = Right("000" & xStrH, 3) xRStr = RupeeFormat_GetD(Mid(xStrH, 1, 1)) & " Lac " Else xRStr = RupeeFormat_GetD(Mid(xStrH, 1, 1)) & " Hundred " End If End If xRStr = xRStr & RupeeFormat_GetT(Mid(xStrH, 2)) Else xRStr = xRStr & RupeeFormat_GetD(Mid(xStrH, 3)) End If End If RupeeFormat_GetH = xRStr End Function Function RupeeFormat_GetT(xTStr As String) Dim xTArr1 As Variant Dim xTArr2 As Variant Dim xRStr As String xTArr1 = Array("Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen") xTArr2 = Array("", "Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy", "Eighty", "Ninety") Result = "" If Val(Left(xTStr, 1)) = 1 Then xRStr = xTArr1(Val(Mid(xTStr, 2, 1))) Else xRStr = xTArr2(Val(Left(xTStr, 1)) - 1) End If xRStr = xRStr & RupeeFormat_GetD(Right(xTStr, 1)) End If RupeeFormat_GetT = xRStr End Function Function RupeeFormat_GetD(xDStr As String) Dim xArr_1() As Variant xArr_1 = Array(" One", " Two", " Three", " Four", " Five", " Six", " Seven", " Eight", " Nine", "") RupeeFormat_GetD = xArr_1(Val(xDStr) - 1) Else RupeeFormat_GetD = "" End If End Function Step 3

Then, using the ALT + Q command, save the sheet as a macro-enabled workbook and exit the vba application.

Step 4

To get all the results, drag down from the first result using the auto-fill handle, and our final result will be similar to the below image.

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we used a simple example to demonstrate how you can convert numbers to words in Excel.

How To Remove Spaces Between Characters And Numbers In Excel?

In this post, we will show you how to remove spaces between characters and numbers in Excel. Whether you want to remove leading or trailing spaces or trim extra spaces between words and numbers in Microsoft Excel, this post will help you get rid of all unnecessary spaces that stick with your data while importing or copying-pasting it from external applications.

Extra spaces may sometimes appear with non-printable characters that may be hard to deal with. When you apply functions to such data, Excel counts these spaces as additional characters and shows incorrect results or throws errors. For example, if you compare two cells with the same content, the result may be incorrect if one of them consists of extra spaces.

Spaces may easily be recognized with the naked eye, but they too could be hard to spot in large data sets. In this post, we will guide you on how to remove these unwanted spaces using different methods.

How to remove Spaces between Characters and Numbers in Excel

The following methods will help you remove spaces between characters and numbers in Excel:

Remove spaces using the TRIM() function.

Remove spaces using the SUBSTITUTE() function.

Remove spaces using the Find and Replace feature.

Let us see these in detail.

Remove spaces in Excel using the TRIM() function

The TRIM() function is a text function in Excel that is used to fix irregular spacing. It removes all extra spaces from a given text string, leaving no spaces at the beginning and the end of the string and just a single space between the words of the string. When you’re dealing with textual data, using the TRIM() function to strip unwanted spaces would be helpful.

The syntax of the TRIM function is:

TRIM(text)

where text refers to the text string or reference to the cell containing the text string.

Let the understand this with the help of an example.

Suppose we have an Excel file containing the ‘Author Name’ and ‘Author Code’ for authors of TheWindowsClub as shown in the above image. The data consists of irregular spacing which needs to be fixed. For this, we may use the TRIM() function as follows:

Place your cursor on cell C5 and type the following function:

=TRIM(A5)

To use this method with your data, you will have to apply the function in a new column/cell and then copy-paste the results into the original column/cell. While pasting the data, make sure to select the Values (V) option in Paste Options.

Notes:

If your data consists of some non-printable characters, TRIM() function will not remove them. For this, you need to use the CLEAN() function. If the data consists of both extra spaces and non-printable characters, you may use a combination of both functions.

If you apply this formula to a number, it will remove leading and trailing spaces but limit the in-between spaces to 1. For removing all the spaces from numbers, you may use the next two methods.

Remove spaces using the SUBSTITUTE() function in Excel

SUBSTITUTE() is another text function that lets you replace an existing text with a new text in Excel. You may use this function to remove all the spaces (leading, trailing, and all in-between spaces) from a text string or a number.

The Syntax of SUBSTITUTE() function is:

Substitute (text,old_text,new_text,[instance_ num])

Where text refers to the main text string

old_text refers to the specific text that needs to be replaced with new_text

new_text refers to the text that should substitute the old_text

[instance_ num] is an optional parameter that refers to the occurrence of old_text that should be replaced with new_text. If this is not specified, all the occurrences of the old_text will be replaced.

Taking the above example, we may remove extra spaces between characters and numbers in Excel using the SUBSTITUTE() function as follows:

Place your cursor on cell C5 and type the following function:

=SUBSTITUTE(A5, " ", "")

The above function will replace all space characters with an empty string. Hence it will also remove the in-between spaces from the author names, as shown in the above image. Therefore it is best suited to remove spaces between numbers. Or in special cases may be used to remove spaces between words or characters.

Also, this function too will require you to apply it in a new column/cell. Once you get the results, you may copy-paste them to your original column/cell.

Read: Excel is slow to respond or stops working.

Remove spaces in Excel using the Find and Replace feature

The above results may also be achieved using the Find and Replace feature in Excel. As you may already know, Find and Replace is a handy feature that lets you replace a specific text with another text and is most commonly used for data correction, such as spelling mistakes. However, it can also be used to remove unwanted spaces, such as leading, trailing, or the extra spaces between numbers or characters in Excel.

The key benefit of using this feature is that it can work on a selected cell range or the entire worksheet in one go. So you don’t have to apply functions somewhere else and then copy-paste the results to the original cells. You can simply select the data range and use the feature. However, bear in mind that this will also remove the single space that separates words within a text string. So make sure you choose the appropriate method as per your requirement.

To remove spaces between characters and numbers in the above example, we may use the Find and Replace feature in Excel as follows:

Select the data range.

Select the Replace option.

In the Find and Replace dialogue box, enter a space in the Find what field.

Do not enter anything in the Replace with field. Leave it empty.

This will replace all the spaces with an empty string. Hence all the extra spaces will be removed from your Excel data.

Another important point to note here is the Find and Replace feature considers the leading zeros (0) as spaces. So it will remove all the zeroes from the beginning of your numbers.

Read Next: Convert JSON to Excel using free online converter tools.

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