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The Google Ads Keyword Planner is a useful tool; there’s no doubt about that.

Whether you’re starting your first Google Ads campaign or your hundredth campaign, having a plan or forecast is critical.

But have you ever thought of using the Keyword Planner as a way to forecast trends in the future?

Staying ahead of the curve by predicting demand can set you apart in any competitive market.

In this post, I’ll walk through how to use the Keyword Planner tool and how to use it so your PPC and SEO efforts can work together.

What Is The Google Ads Keyword Forecast Tool?

It’s one thing to know what’s trending now.

That’s a valuable asset for any digital marketer.

But what about what will be trending tomorrow or farther into the future? How do you even predict that?

The Google Ads Keyword Forecast tool does just that.

It’s an awesome option for anyone looking to up their SEM and SEO game by narrowing down the future potential for any keywords or groups of keywords.

According to Google, it updates its forecasts daily with data from up to 10 days past.

This data includes market changes that occurred throughout this time.

It also considers seasonality, so you’re not confused by natural market fluctuations.

In short, Google Ads Keyword Forecast is a pretty cool tool.

How (& Why) To Use The Forecast Tool

The forecast tool is a multifaceted part of Google Ads, and it just goes to show how useful the Ads platform is as a whole.

It goes well beyond today’s data and delivers insights for the near future.

It can even help inform other future efforts or initiatives, as well as benefitting other channels like SEO.

So, what does this forecast tell you?

The forecast tool will help you figure out how your keywords will perform in optimal settings.

You can:

View a chart of your estimated performance.

See projections for individual keywords or grouped keywords.

View how these estimates change when you adjust your max CPC or bidding strategy.

Your forecast has a date range, and you can change the time frame to see how it affects your forecast.

There are two ways to see forecasts on Google Ads, so let’s break down the Google Ads Keyword Forecast tool for you, step by step.

How To Use It For Forecasting

Within the Google Ads Keyword Planner, you’ll find something called a forecast.

Once you’re here, you can enter an individual keyword or a group of keywords that are separated by commas or line breaks.

The three tabs are Forecasts, Saved keywords, and Negative keywords.

For the forecasting side of things, you’ll obviously want to stay under the first tab.

You’ll see a selection of forecast data based on the keywords you entered.

Automatically, Google Ads will forecast on a defaulted monthly basis:

Impressions.

Cost or your average projected spend.

Conversions.

Average cost per acquisition (CPA).

Here’s an example of what the aggregated forecast looks like based on your inputs:

You can update the date settings if you’re looking for a shorter or longer period.

In the end, you’ll be left with a pretty nifty graph and data chart that showcases future predictions (or forecasts) for your selected keywords.

This helps you determine the best plan of action for campaigns to come and even lets you know if you should adjust existing campaigns based on consumer queries and behavior.

Remember that the numbers you see associated with each metric are what you’re likely to achieve for your keywords or a group of keywords based on your ad spend.

These numbers will change if your budget changes, proving just how holistic Google’s approach really is.

However, Google clearly shows that spending more doesn’t necessarily equate to better conversions.

When you’re done, take one or all of these steps:

Download your forecast. To do this, select the download button on the page.

Think about how this fits into your paid media, SEO, and content marketing roadmap.

Is This The Only Way To See Forecasts On Google Ads?

Short answer: No, it’s not!

When you use Discover new keywords, you can:

Discover new ideas for keywords.

Edit an existing list of keywords based on what the data shows.

But in addition to these, you can also see a performance forecast once keywords are on your plan.

As an optional measure, you can create a new campaign based on positive forecasts.

Or, you can use them to beef up your existing campaigns.

If you want to add keywords to your plan from Discover new keywords so you can forecast their performance, you can follow a few simple steps:

Choose either Add to plan or Add to existing campaign.

Select Add keywords, and voila!

How To See Keyword Trends In Google Ads

The best way to see keyword trends in Google Ads is within the “Saved keywords” section from the left-hand navigation.

Average monthly searches.

Three-month change.

YoY change.

Competition (low, medium, or high).

Ad impression share.

Top-of-page bid (low and high ranges).

An example of how this would look in Google Ads is below:

Combine this historical data with forecasted projections from your Google Ads account, and you’ll have a comprehensive picture of keywords for your industry!

Note: While the Google Ads Keyword Forecast tool accounts for things like bid, budget, and seasonality, historical data doesn’t. Just keep this in mind during your comparisons.

How Google Ads Keyword Forecast Tool Fits In With The Overall Paid Media Mix

Paid media is best served holistically. PPC should not be operating in a silo.

While the Google Ads Keyword Forecast tool should be a well-used component in your marketing repertoire, it’s not your only friend.

By using all these tools combined, you can craft a well-planned, holistic marketing strategy.

Identifying core keywords and trends can help inform marketing areas such as:

PPC strategy and realistic budget.

Content and copy creation.

On-page SEO.

Fuse the Google Ads Forecast tool with other tools, like:

Google Trends

Search traffic by any given term or company.

You can compare terms and entities, plus visualize data by location, related topics, and breakout terms.

Use Google Trends to answer the question: What are some recent changes in the landscape?

Google Benchmark Report

This report lives inside Google Analytics.

The Benchmark Report looks at your individual traffic and compares it to the industry benchmark.

Remember that this benchmark comes from the overall industry, not necessarily a particular niche within that sector.

You’ll see how you stack up against national players in the game.

The most useful part of this report for you is comparing your own historical and current data, so you can see just how far you’ve come.

Google Ads Automated Insights

This is a recent development from Google.

Using the power of Google Trends, it imports relevant data into your Google Ads account.

With that data in hand, you can see breakout terms and their forecasted growth.

It’s a super-powerful addition that can potentially improve business and marketing planning by a landslide.

If there were ever a way to slide into a new category before the competition, this is it.

Semrush Data

Learn today’s keyword search volume and compare it monthly for the last six months.

You’ll know what the search volume used to look like and use that data to determine what keywords you should be focusing on now and in the future.

Their keyword planner also offers forecasts, so that’s another tool you can add to your toolbox.

Google Intelligence Events

Using artificial intelligence, Google Intelligence Events tells you if there’s a marked change (either up or down) in your site traffic.

You can even select your own events to automate tailored insight.

A cohesive combination of tools will help you boost your business like the pro you are.

Keep in mind these are just a handful of tools — you’ll find plenty more to back you up along the way.

Conclusion

The Google Ads Keyword Planner Forecast tool has a wealth of information.

Whether you’re looking to add new keywords to your campaign mix or understand future trends for your existing campaigns, this tool has it all.

Not only are the forecast trends important, but what’s even more important is how you use the data.

Forecasting trends helps more than just identifying competition and potential budget; when coupled with other tools, it helps you create a powerful, holistic marketing plan.

Use these tools to help you stay ahead of the game and keep a leg up on your competitors.

More Resources:

Featured Image: fizkes/Shutterstock

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7 Google Tools To Use When Conducting Keyword Research Today

Consumer behavior is changing rapidly and unpredictably during the coronavirus pandemic.

That’s why conducting keyword research is now more important than ever to understand the latest shifts in consumer intent.

Although 100% of SEO professionals worth their salt understand how to dig insights out of Google Search Console and know which keyword tools have helped them in the past to increase traffic, rankings, and visibility in search results, this is the time to think outside the search box.

Even one new insight per fortnight can help your company or clients pivot to create more relevant content as they navigate the “new normal.”

Here are some places that I now visit virtually every weekday and some tools that I’ve reached for in the toolbox that I rarely used before I had to start dealing with strange things that go bump in the night.

1. Rising Retail Categories

In May 2023, Think with Google launched an interactive tool called Rising Retail Categories to help us understand:

Fast-rising retail categories in Google Search.

The locations where they’re growing.

The queries associated with them.

For example, the top trending categories in the U.S. year-over-year include:

Sprinkler controls.

Sneeze guards.

Household disinfectants.

Neck gaiters.

Protective masks.

Or, focus on the top trending categories month-over-month to discover:

Food Container Covers (+100%).

Crayons (+100%).

Medical Equipment (+90%).

Pen & Pencil Cases (+70%).

Baby & Toddler Outerwear (+60%).

Then, tackle the top trending categories week-over-week, and examine:

Blank ID Cards (+40%).

Pie & Pastry Fillings (+30%).

Play Mats & Gyms (+30%).

Foosball Tables (+30%).

Neck Gaiters (+30%).

Chalkboards (+30%).

If your company or clients makes any of these products, this is your opportunity to spot a key trend and become a hero.

2. Coronavirus Search Trends

In March 2023, Google launched Coronavirus Search Trends.

There was a surge in search interest for the topic, coronavirus, from late February through early May.

Since then, search interest in coronavirus has fallen below the topic, weather, and is now roughly equal with search interest in the topic, news, but still remains above the topics of sports and music.

3. The U.S. Economy & COVID-19

Recently, Google has added a new section of its Coronavirus Search Trends that is focused on The U.S. Economy and COVID-19.

How has the Coronavirus pandemic affected searches around the economy?

How do they compare now to searches in the past?

Scroll down the page to see search interest in the term, recession, since 2004.

And keep scrolling down to see the spikes in search interest in other terms, like unemployment benefits, food bank, food stamps, and mortgage forbearance.

Or, look at the map of the country to see where search interest in terms like debt, bankruptcy, and “can’t pay rent” are located.

4. Shopping Insights

Google launched Shopping Insights in October 2024, but I’ve rarely used the tool before the COVID-19 recession despite the fact that it enables you to see how your company or clients stack up against your competitors, and it lets you track competing products in your category.

In these “extraordinarily uncertain” times, it’s a life saver.

Now, it’s painfully obvious that this year’s disruptions are making it hard for retailers to plan for the holidays.

But, Shopping Insights helps them stay up to date on what shoppers want and follow trends in their category.

How can Google provide these shopping insights?

According to Think with Google, in 63% of shopping scenarios, shoppers go online to conduct research before they make a purchase decision, regardless of whether they end up buying online or in a store.

With daily search data for 55,000+ products, 45,000+ brands, and nearly 5,000 categories across the U.S., Shopping Insights helps you better understand customers’ shopping intent online, and make more informed merchandising and marketing decisions across online and offline channels.

For example, the top brands in the Toys & Games category, based on data from July 17 to August 16, 2023, are:

LEGO.

Hasbro.

Mattel.

Funko.

Hot Wheels.

So, if you are planning for either Small Business Saturday or the entire Holiday Season, you know which brands to stock on your shelves.

5. Market Finder

Google launched Market Finder in November 2023, but I’ve rarely used the tool in the past.

But, it has now become a game-changer when helping clients navigate the “new normal.”

For example, I’m working with the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR) to generate applications for its Online Professional Masters in Human Resource Management program.

By entering SMLR’s URL into Market Finder, I was able to calculate which regions offer the best opportunities for growth, based on key metrics for my chosen categories.

Within the United States, they are California, Texas, and Florida.

For Rutgers, which is the State University of New Jersey, this came as a major surprise, because it represents a significant shift from the geographic trends before the pandemic.

6. Google Surveys

Google Consumer Surveys was launched in March 2012. It was renamed Google Surveys in October 2024.

It’s become one of the essential tools in my toolkit for getting valuable insights into the minds of my clients’ target audiences.

If you haven’t used it yet, Google Surveys is a market research tool that gathers data from survey questions that you write.

Web users answer your survey questions in order to access high-quality content on the Google Display Network.

In turn, content publishers get paid as their users answer your questions. Google then aggregates and analyzes the responses through a simple online interface.

Yes, I also use Search Console and keyword tools. But, those tell me “what” people are searching for.

They don’t tell me “why” people are conducting those queries.

Only now, Google Surveys help me uncover search intent, which is much more valuable.

I have frequently used screening questions to ensure that the respondents to a particular survey represent the niche audience that my client is targeting, instead of anyone and everyone who used a search term.

And Google Surveys has enabled me to get answers within days instead of weeks with more traditional survey methods.

Oh, and did I mention that it was cheap?

No, it’s not free, but prices start of $0.10 per completed survey, although I typically pay about $1.50 per completed survey because I use surveys with 2 to 10 questions that are targeted at respondents of specific ages, genders, or locations.

For example, keyword research will generally help me select a keyword phrase to optimize the title and headline of a landing page.

But, Google Surveys will help me to ensure that the content on that landing page actually addresses the consumer intent behind the query.

Why is that valuable?

Because you can do more than generate organic search traffic.

7. Google Trends

Google Trends was launched in May 2005, so it’s the oldest tool on this list.

And many SEO professionals don’t use it that often because it doesn’t provide data on organic search volumes.

But these aren’t normal times.

And finding insights that can be processed within minutes of an event happening in the real world can get SEOs a seat at the table where strategic decisions are made.

For example, I just taught a course for the New Media Academy (NMA) on “Creating a Digital Marketing Strategy” to a group of more than 100 business professionals in the United Arab Emirates.

And one of the recent articles that I shared with my NMA class was entitled, How people decide what to buy lies in the ‘messy middle’ of the purchase journey.

It was written by Alistair Rennie and Jonny Protheroe, who both work on Google’s consumer insights team, and it was published last month in Think with Google.

Rennie and Protheroe used Google Trends to take a look at worldwide search interest for “best” vs. “cheap” from January 1, 2004, through July 1, 2023.

Now, I don’t know about you, but I’ve never done this particular comparison before.

And I was surprised to see that worldwide search interest for “best” has increased steadily over the past 16-and-a-half years, while worldwide search interested for “cheap” had decreased steadily over the same period of time.

Oh, and the Great Recession of 2007-2009 didn’t impact these trends at all.

Now, that’s in insight worth taking to the next Zoom meeting of your entire marketing team.

As your company or clients deal with these “extraordinarily uncertain” times, this is not time to create and optimize new content for “cheap.”

You should create and optimize new content for “best,” instead.

Why?

Because that’s what your customers are searching for.

And, even though we’re facing an unprecedented crisis, it’s worth remembering that a crisis represents both a threat and an opportunity for your company or clients.

That means this unprecedented crisis represents a threat and an opportunity for you, too.

That’s why this is no time to continue using the same old tools that you learned to use five, 10, or 15 years ago.

It’s time to explore some or all of the alternatives mentioned above.

Who knows, they may help your company or clients bounce back from the COVID-19 recession more quickly, or they may even help you bounce forward to your next promotion in a shorter period of time.

More Resources:

Python ‘Yield’ Keyword—What Does It Do?

When you call a function with a yield keyword, the code in the function does not run. Instead, a generator object is created. You can store the generator object to a variable. This generator object has the ability to run the code inside the function on demand.

When you invoke the generator object, Python runs the code inside the generator function once. It stops when there is a yield keyword and delivers a value to the caller.

When you invoke the generator again, the execution continues from where it stopped. In other words, Python runs the function again, and stops at the next yield keyword, and delivers the value once again.

This process continues until there are no more values to yield.

A function that uses a yield keyword is a generator function. Generators are useful when you need to iterate values without storing them in memory.

yield keyword and generators work on a technical level, you should first learn what iterators and iterables are. Here is a yield keyword without understanding iterables and iterators.

To truly understand how thekeyword and generators work on a technical level, you should first learn what iterators and iterables are. Here is a complete guide you might want to check. But you can also get a decent idea of thekeyword without understanding iterables and iterators.

This guide teaches you what the yield keyword does on a high level without technical details about iterators and iterables.

Why Yield in Python?

The yield keyword is useful when you are looping through a big group of values. The reason why you might want to use yield instead of return boils down to memory efficiency.

But what if there are like 1 billion words on the file?

A Python program cannot handle a list of 1 billion words. Thus, you cannot store the words in a list! To come over this, you need a mechanism in which you don’t have to store the words in a list yet you can still loop through them.

This is where you can use generators, that is, functions that yield values.

The idea of a generator is to not store all the words in memory at once. Instead, the generator loops through the collection one word at a time. It only stores the current word in memory. Besides, it knows how to get the next one. This way the generator can loop through the list of 1 billion words without having any trouble with memory consumption. Theoretically, you could use a generator like this to loop through an infinite number of words because practically no memory is needed.

The best part is that the generator syntax looks identical to applying for…in loop on a list. So even though the mechanism is entirely different, the syntax remains.

Example

When you call a function with a yield keyword, you create a generator object. When you invoke this generator object (for example by using a for loop), you are essentially asking it to give the next value in the group of values you are looping through. This process continues until there are no values left.

For example, here is a generator function that squares a list of numbers

def square(numbers): for n in numbers: yield n ** 2

Now, let’s call this function and print the result:

squares = square([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) print(squares)

Output:

You might think this object stores the squares of the numbers [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], right? But this is not the case! The squares object doesn’t store a single value nor does it have a single square calculated anywhere. Instead, the generator object gives you the ability to calculate the squares on demand.

To actually calculate the squares, you need to invoke the generator object. One way to do this is by using the built-in next() function. This function asks the generator to compute the next squared value.

Let’s call the next() function five times and print the results:

print(next(squares)) print(next(squares)) print(next(squares)) print(next(squares)) print(next(squares))

Output:

1 4 9 16 25

As you can see, each next() function call delivers the next squared value in the list. In other words, each next() call runs the square() function once to compute and deliver the right squared value.

But how does it know which value to compute?

The generator object remembers where it left since the last time someone called next() on it. This is how it knows how to choose the next value correctly.

But this whole next() function thing is a bit confusing, isn’t it? Sure! You shouldn’t actually use the next() function to iterate a generator. Instead, you can use a good old for loop to invoke the generator.

def square(numbers): for n in numbers: yield n ** 2 squares = square([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) for square in squares: print(square)

Output:

1 4 9 16 25

Notice that the for loop calls the next() function on the generator behind the scenes. It does this until there are no values for the generator to calculate.

I hope you now have a better understanding of the yield keyword.

Next, let’s take a quick look at how you can understand the intent of a yielding function better.

Shortcut for Understanding Yield in Action

If you are new to generators and yielding, here is a trick you can do to understand what the yielding code does.

Notice that this trick is not an equivalent replacement for the yield statement! But rather, it helps you understand what the code does if you are not comfortable reading code that uses the yield keyword.

Here is the trick. When you see a yield keyword:

Add this line as the first line of the function: result = [].

Replace all the yield val expressions with result.append(val).

Add a return result to the bottom of the function.

Now read the function and understand what it does.

Compare the function to the original one.

Let’s see an example of applying this trick to a function with the yield keyword. Here is an example of a generator function:

def square(numbers): for n in numbers: yield n ** 2

To see what this function does, let’s apply the above steps to the function:

1. Add result = [] to the beginning of the function.

def square(numbers): result = [] for n in numbers: yield n ** 2

2. Replace yield val with result.append(val).

def square(numbers): result = [] for n in numbers: result.append(n ** 2)

3. Add return result to the bottom of the function.

def square(numbers): result = [] for n in numbers: result.append(n ** 2) return result

4. Read the function and understand what it does.

So, now you can clearly see that this function takes a list of numbers, squares the numbers, and returns a list of squared numbers.

It’s important you understand that this modification is not a replacement for the yielding function! Instead, it helps you understand the original code better.

To fully understand what the yield keyword does, you need to understand what are iterables, iterators, and generators. Here is a complete guide you should read.

Conclusion

The yield keyword is a memory-efficient way to loop through a big collection of values. A function with the yield keyword is called a generator.

A generator function doesn’t store the iterated values in memory. Instead, it cares about the current value and knows how to get the next one. This makes it possible to loop through a huge number of values. You only need memory for a single value.

You can apply the traditional for loop syntax when iterating a generator object. When doing this, the generator generates the values on the go.

Further Reading

How To Link Google Ads To Google Analytics Step

🚨 Note: All standard Universal Analytics properties will stop processing new hits on July 1, 2023. 360 Universal Analytics properties will stop processing new hits on October 1, 2023. That’s why it is recommended to do the GA4 migration. We’ve also created a GA4 version of this post.

Google Ads and Google Analytics are both powerful marketing tools on their own—but what if you could get the best of both worlds by connecting them?

In this guide, you’ll learn why you should link Google Ads to Google Analytics, how to do it, and how to make sense of the collected data. 

An overview of what we’ll cover: 

So let’s start!

Why Connect Your Google Ads and Google Analytics Accounts?

Linking your Google Analytics account to your Google Ads account has two major benefits that you wouldn’t be able to leverage from these tools separately. 

Observe the Behavior of Google Ad Traffic

Firstly, you’ll be able to track the behavior of the users that visit your website from a Google Ad.

For example, did the user visits other pages on the website? Or did they leave immediately? Are they more likely to convert than users who arrived from other sources?

You can answer all of these questions by importing Google Analytics metrics like Bounce Rate, Pages/Session, and Average Session Duration into your Google Ads account.

Thus, linking these two accounts extends your ability to track traffic and user behavior. It also tells you about the quality of traffic that you’re buying with Google Ads.

Google Analytics Retargeting Audience

Secondly, you can retarget an audience from your Google Analytics account using Google Ads. 

Depending on your requirements, you can create different types of audiences in Google Analytics and target them using Google Ads.

Apart from this, you can also import Analytics goals and Ecommerce transactions into your Google Ads account for better goal tracking. Similarly, you can import cross-device conversions into your Google Ads account when you activate Google signals.

So let’s see how to connect these accounts!

Log In with the Same Email Address on Both Accounts

We’ll start by logging into both of our accounts.

🚨 Note: Make sure you are logged in with the same email address on your Google Ads account that you are logged in with your Google Analytics account.

First, find your Google Ads email address at the top right-hand side of the screen.

Your Google Analytics email address will be found under your account name.

Next, we’ll need to check whether we have the correct account permissions set for connecting. 

Check That You Have the Right Account Permissions

One major thing we need to take care of is to grant correct permissions. 

Let’s see how!

Google Ads Permissions

Then, check your access under Access level. You need to have Admin access level set up with your email address.

Google Analytics Permissions

Go over to the Admin section at the lower left-hand side of the platform.

Under User Management, you need to have edit access to the account.

Link Your Accounts Together

Check the compatibility of your Google Ads IDs.

Choose and input an account name in the Link group title field. This way, if you have multiple accounts that you connect to your Google Ads account, you can determine where this is coming from. 

Choose where you want to pull data from. You are allowed to choose multiple views. 

Enable auto-tagging to automatically pull data from your Google Ads account into Google Analytics. 

You may also want to leave auto-tagging settings as they are, especially if you are utilizing UTM tags and you want to avoid mixing it up with the auto-tagging feature.

You may also want to try to link Google Ads and Google Analytics through Google Ads’ linking wizard.

So let’s go ahead and see how the data will look once the two accounts are linked! 

Looking at Live Data

Open the homepage of your Google Analytics account. You’ll be able to see all the campaigns and reports under Acquisition → Google Ads → Campaigns. 

On the top of the screen, you’ll see the sales charts. It will show the number of Users vs. Transactions report of a particular timeframe for your campaign.

Going further down on the Campaigns page, you’ll see the different metrics of your campaigns. 

For example, you’ll find the Cost and Revenue in this report. You’ll also see the Ecommerce Conversion Rate, Bounce Rate, Sessions, etc. for your campaigns. 

Similarly, you can analyze and compare the results of different campaigns to increase their effectiveness. 

For example, the bounce rate of a smart campaign can be considered good even if it’s around 80%, but the bounce rate of a shopping campaign will be considered good only if it’s really low.

You can definitely obtain revenue-related information from your Google Ads account. But when you analyze the reports with your Google Analytics account, you can make more informed decisions as you have a holistic view of data. 

FAQ What account permissions do I need to connect my accounts? What data can I see once my accounts are linked?

After linking your accounts, you’ll be able to see more data in both Google Ads and Google Analytics. In Google Analytics, go to Acquisition → Google Ads → Campaigns to view campaigns and reports. You’ll see sales charts, metrics like Cost, Revenue, Ecommerce Conversion Rate, Bounce Rate, and Sessions. You can analyze and compare the results of different campaigns to optimize their effectiveness.

How does linking Google Ads and Google Analytics help with decision-making?

Linking the two accounts provides a holistic view of data, allowing for more informed decision-making. While revenue-related information can be obtained from Google Ads, analyzing reports in Google Analytics provides additional insights and a comprehensive understanding of user behavior, enabling better decision-making for ad campaigns.

Summary

So that’s all you need to know about linking your Google Analytics account with your Google Ads account. 

Have you started doing keyword research for your Google Ads campaign? Check out our handy guide on how to use Google Keyword Planner for SEO keyword research.

Google Explains How To Use The Removals Tool In Search Console To Hide Content

Google’s Daniel Waisberg explains to site owners how they can temporarily hide content in Google search results using Search Console.

This information was provided in the company’s latest Search Console Training video dedicated to the removals report in Search Console.

In the video Waisberg also talks about removing outdated and inappropriate content, and the steps you should take to remove content permanently.

Removals Report in Search Console

First, here’s some general information about the removals report.

Site owners can only remove content with Search Console on a temporary basis.

Additional steps must be taken in order to remove content permanently.

It’s also important to know that the removals tool cannot be used for anything other than managing search results from your own website.

The tool cannot be used to remove personal information or report offensive information that exists on other websites.

The removals report is separated into three sections:

Temporary removals

Outdated content

SafeSearch filtering

Here’s more on each of these sections.

Temporary Removal Requests

A temporary removal request is a way to remove specific pieces of content from your site in Google search results.

For example, if you need to take a URL out of search results quickly, then this is the tool to use.

A successful temporary removal requests lasts for six months.

Google believes six months is enough time for site owners to either adjust the content so that it can be seen, or find a more permanent solution for removing it.

Site owners can access their removals report directly from the navigation bar in Search Console.

After selecting the Removals report tab, the report should automatically open to the temporary removals section.

From there you can submit a new removal request.

There are two types of removal requests available:

Clear cached URL: Clears the cached page and wipes out the page description snippet in search results until the page is crawled again.

For each of these options you can submit a request for a single, specific URL or for an entire URL prefix.

A summarized report of page removal requests from the past six months can be found in the temporary removals section.

In the report you’ll see the URL, the type of removal request, the date the request was submitted, and the status of the request.

You can also use the report to cancel the request if it’s no longer necessary.

Outdated Content

The outdated content section provides information on removal requests made through the public remove outdated content tool.

Anyone can use the remove outdated content tool to update search results that show information which is no longer present on a page.

This is something you probably won’t need to look at much, Google says, because searchers can’t simply force pages to be removed from search results.

There are two types of reports within in the outdated content report:

Outdated cache removal: This is used when the page still exists but some content has been removed.

Outdated page removal: This is used when the content no longer exists and a user has requested its removal from Google search results

Like the temporary removals report, this report also keeps track of all requests submitted within the past six months.

SafeSearch Filtering

SafeSearch is a setting in Google that can be used to filter out sexually explicit results.

The SafeSearch filtering section in Search Console displays a list of pages on your site that were reported by users as adult content.

Unlike the other tools we just went over, URLs submitted via the SafeSearch filtering tool are reviewed by Google.

Google looks at the page and determines whether the content should be filtered from SafeSearch search results.

If it’s decided that a page should be filtered then Google tags it as adult content.

You can view a history of all your URLs that were reported to SafeSearch filtering in the past six months.

What if a Page Needs to be Permanently Removed?

As mentioned previously, the temporary removals tool is not capable of permanently removing pages from search results.

To permanently remove pages from Google search results you must take one or more of the following actions:

Remove the content from your site and return either a 404 or a 410 HTTP status code.

Non-HTML files that appear in search results, such as PDFs, should be completely removed from your server.

Block access to the content by requiring a password.

Use a noindex meta tag to indicate that the page should not be indexed.

Google notes that redirecting one page to another using a 310 status code is not enough to completely remove it from search results.

A chúng tôi directive will not work as a blocking mechanism either.

For more details, see the full video below:

Build A Brilliant Google Ads Audience

If you’ve been working with Google Ads/AdWords for a while, you know that it’s great for targeting intent.

But “the almighty keyword” is losing its potency.

Not because keyword targeting isn’t effective, but because Google Ads is pivoting away from contextual and keyword targeting in favor of audiences.

As we lose control of precision matching, we have two (seemingly) less-desirable options: Get better at audience-first targeting, or lose market share to those who do.

But, done right, Google Ads audience targeting is a great way to reach – and generate demand among – your target market.

So, let’s look at what’s changing and how to win in the new “audience first” landscape – even if you’d prefer to stick with keywords.

The Upside Of Audience-First For Alphabet

Whether or not a keyword-less approach is in your company’s best interest, it’s certainly working well for Google’s parent company Alphabet.

This chart shows reported annual revenue (in billions), with an overlay of the release of non-keyword products.

Google’s success is obviously due to more than just keyword-less ad offerings. But the expansion of its inventory is non-trivial.

Our prospects spend far less time Googling a product than they do not Googling a product.

Your audience at any given time:

This expansion is great for Google’s bottom line, but how about yours?

Here’s a step-by-step look at how to build an audience-first strategy that keeps you competitive.

Create An Audience-First Strategy

An audience-first strategy isn’t entirely different from an intent-first strategy, but you’ll need to reframe how you target your prospects.

Define Your Campaign Objectives

The campaign’s goal reveals the best approach to take with strategy and targeting. Consider this frequently-asked audience question:

“Should I exclude remarketing from the audiences in my campaign?”

If the purpose of your campaign is to reach new audiences, then it would make sense to exclude prior visitors or customers.

If, however, the objective is to reach people who are familiar with your brand, then this exclusion would be fatal for that campaign.

Knowing your objective will make successful audience selection much easier to think through.

Define Your Audience And Segments

No, we’re not going to imagine a specific user avatar, what color shirt they’re wearing, and what they ate for breakfast this morning.

Instead, consider the attributes that make your audience unique in how they shop for, value, or use your product or service.

Consider things like:

Who they are.

Why they’re that way.

How they’re solving their problem today.

You generally won’t find these answers in your Google Ads data.

It requires work outside of the platform (such as surveys or interviews) to research the characteristics of your customers.

Let’s say you’re selling plant-based (vegan) burgers.

Your audience might include multiple segments:

Beef-lovers who need to reduce their red meat consumption or want to try something new.

Devout vegetarians who want an alternative to dry black bean patties.

Those two groups have different desires, motivations, and alternative options.

They’ll respond best to different messages, and possibly different landing pages and offers.

We’ll need a segmented message strategy for the best results.

Build Your Audiences And Segments In Google Ads

Once you know who you’re trying to reach, you need a plan to reach them.

To reach vegetarians who might enjoy our plant-based burgers, we could target:

Screenshot from Google Ads, April 2023

The audience segment types available in a specific campaign will depend on the campaign type or network you use.

For example, you can target Life events (such as marriage, graduation, or moves) on Display, but not Search.

You can create new segments from Audience manager or directly in your campaign or ad group from the Audiences tab.

Create Distinct, Specific Ad Groups And Campaigns

An exception to this rule is Search campaigns, where intent is strong, and audience segments can be layered into keyword targeting without separating them completely:

But for non-Search campaigns, your audience segments are filling-in for keyword intent, so you’ll want to keep distinct segments separate.

Create Ads Targeted For Your Segments Track And Optimize Your Segments

You can stack multiple, similar segments within an ad group.

If the same person matches more than one segment, Google Ads uses this hierarchy for which audience type gets the credit:

You’ll also find a lot of audience segment data in Audience Manager.

Segment members.

Match rate.

Network eligibility (including segment size).

Segment distribution.

Segment use.

Evaluate your audience performance and edit your settings to optimize and improve your campaigns.

“Don’ts” Of Audience-First Targeting

Don’t target arbitrary attributes. Build audience segments and targeting around meaningful attributes, not arbitrary observations. Categories like age and gender are easy to track, but typically won’t define your market.

Don’t “set it and forget it.” Just like keyword optimization, audience optimization is an iterative process. Pay close attention to overly-broad terms in your custom segments.

“Do’s” Of Audience-First Targeting

Do expect a learning curve. Google Ads has been evolving its functionality and terminology over the last several years, making it feel new and unfamiliar. Be patient with yourself as you (re)learn the ropes.

Do know the rules. Your industry, government restrictions, and other requirements will impact whether and how you can market. Review Google Ads support documentation and updates regularly, so you can stay in the loop.

Conclusion

An audience-first strategy for Google Ads will help you prospect and reach your target market.

Knowing how to group and speak to individual market segments will improve your performance and increase your chances of success.

More resources:

Featured Image: Alones/Shutterstock

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