Trending February 2024 # How To Use Pro Hdr To Create Stunning High Dynamic Range Iphoneography # Suggested March 2024 # Top 2 Popular

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Before we get going, and to celebrate the release of the iPad mini, I decided to give away a few copies of my book “Big World Little Lens – The Complete Guide to iPhone Photography.” It is specifically designed for the iPad and iPad mini. If you haven’t picked up a copy of the book yet, you can here. The cool thing about iPad books is that you will get free updates whenever I publish a new version. Speaking of the a new version, I’m in the middle of a major update that will be hitting the shelves at the beginning of the year. If you get the books now, you will automatically get the free update then.

Today’s Lesson

If you remember back to our original lesson in HDR photography, you know HDR photography is a technique used to achieve a balanced exposure in high contrast scenes. If you don’t know that, I suggest you go back and re-read the post.

However, in the original post we were using the iPhone’s native HDR capabilities. In this post, we are going to gain a bit more control using Pro HDR. Why is does offer more control you ask? Easy, Pro HDR allows you to determine what areas of the scene you would like to meter as the bright and dark areas of the scene.

The Problem

Here in this image, I have a great blue sky and barn, but my brief case is a dark. I’d prefer if it was brighter.

In this image, my bag is properly exposed and you can see its great detail and character (I love this bag) but the barn and sky are way too bright.

The Solution

The solution is simple, take a few photographs that are exposed for the blue sky and beautiful bag rich in character, and blend them together. That would be a pain in the rear for us, but not for your iPhone running Pro HDR. Nope, it’s easy!

Step 1: Fire up Pro HDR and change its HDR mode.

Step 2: Set it to manual.

Step 3: These are your exposure meters. In the photography world we call them “spot meters” because they will meter the light and determine the appropriate exposure at that spot. Makes sense, right? You will want to set one exposure for the bright area of the scene and another for the dark area.

Step 4: Here you will want to apply some finishing touches. You can perform some basic image tuning using the sliders. Then, if you are feeling extra creative you can apply some nifty filter effects.

Brightness – Controls how bright or dark the image is.

Contrast – Controls the relative difference between the dark/light area of your images. Increasing will give you image some pop as it makes dark areas darker and light areas lighter. Decreasing it will make your image flat by doing the opposite.

Saturation – Controls how rich the colors are. Increasing it will boost the vibrancy of them while decreasing it will create a black and white image.

Warmth – Controls how warm or cold your image is. Increasing it will emphasize red tones. Decreasing it will emphasize blue tones.

Tint – It just ‘funkifies’ your colors.

Step 5: If you choose to apply a filter, do so.

Step 6: Once you have your image the way you like it, make sure to save it!

Tips

The only thing you need to look out for when making HDR images is movement. Because you are taking separate photographs and blending them together, any movement (whether it is your iPhone or your subject) will result in ghosts. To combat these ghosts you need to hold still, brace your iPhone, or use a tripod. I know Sebastien hates the idea of tripods, but they really work!

Here’s an example of a ghost or ghosting.

Assignment

Hopefully you all know what to do by now. Let’s spend the next two weeks getting out and making some Pro HDR magic! Make sure to tag your Instagram photos with #iDBProHDR so we can all follow along.

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How To Create A Dynamic Resizable Disk On Os X

Disk Images are indeed most useful for file distribution, but they can also be used to store files on your system, any external media or on a local network server. The server option is most useful if you want to encrypt your files so that no one else can access them.

To create a Disk Image on your OS X system, simply follow the steps below:

2. Select “New Image” from the top row of options in Disk Utility.

3. A drop-down menu similar to the one below will show up. Here, you can name your image and set its size. For this tutorial, we’ve set it as 500MB, but you can set a size according to your own preferences.

(Tidbit: You can also encrypt your disk image here by using the “Encrypt” tab.)

Once created, the image will create and mount where you can copy files to it. However, you’ll notice that even if you don’t fill the 500MB image size, i.e if you enter less than 500MB of data, the image size will still be the same when you created it. So if you created an image that was 500MB in size, then the image file would be 500MB, even if there is only 90MB of data in it.

Now, this may seem logical to some people, but it might not be desired. You may want your disk to be able to contain 500MB of data but not always be 500MB on disk and only grow with the size of items you place in it. A dynamic resizable disk in OS X by following the below instructions:

How to “Sparse” or “Sparsebundle” Your Image With No Partition Scheme

Apple has included the options in Disk Utility to create “sparse” and “sparsebundle” image types. These images are dynamically resizable, meaning, if you create one without a partition, they will start with the size of the files you place in them. They’ll then grow as you keep on adding more files, up to the maximum size you set when creating the image.

To do this, when you’re creating your Disk Image using the steps above, simply select either “sparse” or “sparsebundle” from the “Image Format” menu when creating the image, and then choose “No Partition Map” from the “Partitions” menu, similar to the screenshot below:

Shujaa Imran

Shujaa Imran is MakeTechEasier’s resident Mac tutorial writer. He’s currently training to follow his other passion become a commercial pilot. You can check his content out on Youtube

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How To Create Hdr Images In Lightroom (Step By Step)

Many photographers struggle when trying to shoot a scene with lots of contrasting lights and shadows. For instance, a landscape scene with lots of bright sun and shadows might look beautiful in person, but when you try to capture it with your camera, the brights may be too bright or the darks too dark. A solution is to use HDR (or High Dynamic Range) processing. 

HDR images are created by merging several photos of different exposures into one. If you’ve ever seen an HDR image, you may have been impressed by the detail the picture shows: both in lighter and darker areas. The shadows aren’t flat, and the brights aren’t blown out. HDR is the happy medium of photography. The best part is that you can edit images using HDR in Lightroom.

What Does HDR Mean In Lightroom?

HDR images are created using a process called bracketing. Bracketing combines several photos taken at different exposures into one picture with a more detailed and more accurate display of highlights, mid-tones, and shadows. The process is popular with landscape photographers, as it can be challenging to get details in both shadows and highlights using nothing but natural light.

Landscape photography is also a great fit for HDR processing because the scenes need to be as static as possible. Bracketing places the images on top of each other, so the process requires three or more images that are near replicas of each other except for their exposures. This can be tough if you work with moving subjects like animals or people. You’ll also need a tripod to ensure you get the same exact image every time.

Once you have the images, you can merge them in Lightroom. You can use a few different merge settings to get the final image just right.

How To Merge An HDR Image In Lightroom Step 1: Upload The Bracketed Images

Upload the images you want to use for the HDR process. Remember, these should be nearly identical except for the exposures; otherwise, the process won’t work well.

Step 2: Select The Images

You can also select images from the filmstrip while working in the Library or Develop modules. 

Step 3: Merge The Images Step 4: Set Merge Settings

Once you select to merge your images, the HDR Merge Preview window will open. Wait a few moments for Lightroom to make a preview of the final image — the more photos you select to merge, the longer it will take, so be patient.

Once the preview is created, you’ll see a few settings to the right of the merged image.

The Auto Align setting automatically lines up the photos in case the camera moved a bit between taking the individual images (for example, if you were holding the camera by hand rather than using a tripod). 

This box will be checked automatically, and it doesn’t hurt to leave it checked to ensure the most accurate merge. The Auto Settings box will also be checked already. This will automatically make minor adjustments in the tone of the merged photo.

The Deghost setting is also important in the final merged image. Deghost is also useful in case anything unwanted is featured in the photo, particularly if the subject (if there is one) moved slightly between shots. Obviously, even when using a tripod, objects like trees and clouds might still move, resulting in a strange “ghost” effect near those objects. The deghost setting makes Lightroom automatically reduce the ghost effect.

You can select the Deghost strength from the options provided: Low, Medium, or High (or None). The option you choose entirely depends on the bracketed image set you shot and your preferences. Each HDR image will require something different, but in most cases, Medium works well.

Below the Deghost strength settings, you’ll see the Show Deghost Overlay checkbox. Check this to view the areas of the “ghost” effect that Lightroom detects. The ghost effect appears as a translucent red highlight.

The image will appear in the preview. You’ll be able to notice the difference when looking at one of the images before you merged them alongside the merged image. 

Before After

How To Refine Your Merged HDR Photos In Lightroom

Once you’ve merged the images, there are a few ways you can further refine and enhance the final product. Some photos may benefit from boosting the exposure or contrast, while others may need an adjustment of highlights and shadows or even white balance.

For instance, the HDR process in the below image brought out details in both the darkest and lightest parts of the scene, but we can bring out the shadows on the left side even further to brighten it a bit more. 

In addition, because the HDR process can brighten the dark areas up and brings the light areas down, the resulting image is sometimes flattened. We can fix this by increasing the contrast, which will help the image pop.

Before After

Adjusting the develop settings like exposure, contrast, and white balance can easily and quickly improve the HDR image.

Should You Always Use HDR When Editing Photos?

Because HDR can bring out so many details in an image, you’d think you should always edit using HDR, right? Actually, no! Whether or not you use HDR depends entirely on the photo you want to edit and whether you’ve planned to create an HDR image.

First, you won’t be able to create an HDR image without multiple bracketed images, and the photos need to be almost exactly the same. So if you haven’t planned to create an HDR image, you probably won’t be able to use this technique.

If you don’t already have a set of bracketed images, don’t worry. In some cases, you won’t even need the HDR process to bring out the details in your photo. Adjusting the Highlights, Shadows, Exposure, and even the Whites and Blacks can help find the right balance for your image. I share how to recover highlights in a photo in this tutorial.

Just make sure you’re always shooting in Raw so that your camera picks up the most information possible when taking the picture. That way, you can recover any lost details in the shadows and highlights, regardless of whether you use this HDR technique or not.

How To Create And Use Signals In Django?

Django is a Python web framework developer used to develop web applications faster and write down easy code syntax. Also, Django is a full feature rich application as it contains many features, including the Django signals.

In Django, signals are used to trigger some function whenever any event occurs. For example, when users make some changes in the database, we can trigger a particular function, which can show the changes to users on the web page.

The Django contains a total of 3 types of signals which we have explained below.

Pre_save/post_save − It triggers the action whenever a user saves any object in the database.

Pre_delete/post_delete − It automatically gets triggered whenever users want to delete an object from the database.

Pre_init/post_init − It gets fired whenever a new model is created in the database.

In this tutorial, we will learn to use the signals in Django. Here, we will create an app from scratch and add a code to create a signal.

Users should follow the steps below to create signals in the Django app.

Step 1 − First, install Django on your local computer by running the below command in the terminal if it’s already not installed.

pip install Django

Step 2 − Now, run the below command in the terminal to create new Django project.

django-admin startproject django_demo

Step 3 − After that, run the below command in the terminal to change the directory in the terminal and create a new app called the ‘firstApp’.

cd django_demo python chúng tôi startapp firstApp

Step 4 − Next, we require creating a chúng tôi file inside the ‘firstApp’ folder and add the below code in the file.

from chúng tôi import path from . import views urlpatterns = [ path('', views.create_user) ]

Step 5 − Also, we require to set up the chúng tôi file of the django project. Open the chúng tôi file located inside the django_demo folder, and add the below code into the file.

from django.contrib import admin from chúng tôi import path, include urlpatterns = [ path('admin/', admin.site.urls), # here, firstApp is a app name path('', include("firstApp.urls")), ]

In the above code, we have included the URLs of the ‘firstApp’.

Step 6 − Now, we require to add the ‘firstApp’ inside the chúng tôi file of the django_demo folder. Open the chúng tôi file, and replace the current code with the below code.

INSTALLED_APPS = [ 'django.contrib.admin', 'django.contrib.auth', 'django.contrib.contenttypes', 'django.contrib.sessions', 'django.contrib.messages', 'django.contrib.staticfiles', 'firstApp', ]

In the above code, we have added the ‘firstApp’ inside the INSALLED_APPS array.

Step 7 − Now, we will create a model to save the user’s data in the database. Open the chúng tôi file inside the ‘firstApp’ directory and add the below code into that.

from chúng tôi import models class User(models.Model): # Adding the name name = models.CharField(max_length=100) # Adding the email email = models.EmailField() def __str__(self): return self.name

In the above code, we have created the ‘User’ model containing the name and email field.

After that, run below both commands in the terminal one by one to migrate the database.

python chúng tôi makemigrations python chúng tôi migrate

Step 8 − Now, create a ‘signals.py’ file inside the ‘firstApp’ directory, and add the code below to create a signal.

from django.db.models.signals import post_save from django.dispatch import receiver from firstApp.models import User @receiver(post_save, sender=User) def user_created(sender, instance, created, **kwargs): if created: print('A new user was created:', instance.name, instance.email)

In the above code, we have used the ‘post_save’ signal with the ‘User’ model. So, whenever a new user is saved in the database, it will call the user_created() function. On successfully creating a user, it prints the user’s name and email on the console.

Step 9 − Also, we require to register the signals in the chúng tôi file. Open the chúng tôi file and add the below code into the file.

from chúng tôi import AppConfig class FirstappConfig(AppConfig): default_auto_field = 'django.db.models.BigAutoField' name = 'firstApp' def ready(self): import firstApp.signals

Step 10 − Next, let’s create a form to take user input. Create a chúng tôi file in the ‘firstApp’ directory and add the below code in the file.

from django import forms from firstApp.models import User class UserForm(forms.ModelForm): class Meta: model = User fields = ('name', 'email')

In the above code, we have imported the User model and created the UserForm class.

Step 11 − Next, let’s create a create_user view in the chúng tôi file to handle the form submission. Open the chúng tôi file and add below code in the file.

from django.shortcuts import render from firstApp.forms import UserForm def create_user(request): # If the form is submitted, save the user. Otherwise, just create an empty form. if request.method == 'POST': form = UserForm(request.POST) if form.is_valid(): form.save() else: form = UserForm() # send the chúng tôi file on the response. return render(request, 'base.html', {'form': form})

In the above code, we check if the method is POST and save the form if all form parameters are valid. Otherwise, we show the form to the users without saving the data of the form. Also, we render the ‘base.html’ template to the users.

Step 12 − Now, we require to create the ‘base.html’ template. Before that, create a ‘templates’ directory in the ‘firstApp’ folder. After that, open the ‘settings.py’ file, and add the below code instead of old code.

TEMPLATES = [{ 'BACKEND': 'django.template.backends.django.DjangoTemplates', 'DIRS': [os.path.join(BASE_DIR, 'templates')], 'APP_DIRS': True, 'OPTIONS': { 'context_processors': [ 'django.template.context_processors.debug', 'django.template.context_processors.request', 'django.contrib.auth.context_processors.auth', 'django.contrib.messages.context_processors.messages', ], }, }, ]

In the above code, we have added the path of the ‘templates’ directory as a value of the ‘DIRS’ property.

Step 13 − Next, create a chúng tôi file inside the ‘templates’ directory, and add below code in the file.

{% csrf_token %} {{ form.as_p }}

The above code will show the form on the web page.

Step 14 − As a last step, you require to run the project by executing the below command in the project directory, which contains the chúng tôi file.

python chúng tôi runserver Output Conclusion

We learned how the signal is used to trigger particular actions whenever any event gets fired. In real-time development, we can use signals to call the functions that send the confirmation email to users whenever a new user is created. Also, there are lots of other use cases of django signals.

How To Create And Use Find Function In Sas?

Introduction to SAS Find

SAS Find is the function to find the input characters on the required user inputs. It will accept all the special characters, including operators and signs. Additionally, the length is used for calculating total characters among the searches finding the occurrence of the specified substring, and returning the same position of the strings. The argument will be single varchar and multi-byte characters for processing the data in SAS.

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The SAS find is one of the functions that can be used to search the string characters finding the position of the data occurrence in specified substring returning the character position of the strings, substrings its not found in the first occurrence of the string and to return the integer value as 0 optional arguments are modified with the modifiers that specified to the one or more in dataset position.

Key Takeaways

It is the function and accepted for the I18N standard for designed SAS data.

The first occurrence of the string character is calculated and specified with the multi-varchar bytes.

So that it will process the find function in the multi-byte data.

Specified character, variables, constants, expressions, and other keywords.

The substring characters are calculated, and add the modifiers as optional parameters.

How to Use SAS Find?

In SAS, find function which helps to find the input strings for the first position and occurrence of the specified substring. It will return the substring position that cannot be found on the character string, substring, modifier, or start-position of the strings with optional arguments on the startpos of the Value. It helps to start the new search position of each character, and the same will be located in each direction from the right side. Suppose the start position of the string length is greater than the find position method to return the Value as an integer in 0.

But a lesser position of the strings will use to start the position in search strings and similar to directions for searching the left side of the strings, and it will compare to other position of the strings that is greater than the string length and starts the string yet to be completed of the string. It equals to return the 0 as the integer format and comparison of the Find function in every search character on each string whereas the FINDC function for searching the individual characters of every string. The find function of the string is calculated on each Index function for searching substrings of the character strings that do not use the modifier or first character string arguments.

Steps to Create SAS Find

Given below are the steps to create SAS find:

1. Navigate to below link.

3. Paste the below code for to creating the dataset.

4. data August1;

5. input a $1-20;

6. datalines;

7. Welcome To My Domain

8. Have a Nice day

9. Hello how are you

10. Thank you for your Patience

11. ;

12. run;

13. proc print data=August1;

14. Then we can use the find() method for to search the position of the strings.

15. data August2;

16. set August1;

17. res = find(a, “how”);

18. run;

19. Here we used the find() method to find the characters of the given strings.

SAS Find Function

SAS Find is the function to find the input characters on the required user inputs. It will accept all the special characters, including operators and signs. Additionally, the length is used for calculating total characters among the searches finding the occurrence of the specified substring and returning the exact position of the strings. The argument will be single varchar and multi-byte characters for processing the data in SAS.

The SAS find is one of the functions that can be used to search the string characters finding the position of the data occurrence in specified substring returning the character position of the strings, substrings its not found in the first occurrence of the string and to return the integer value as 0 optional arguments are modified with the modifiers that specified to the one or more in dataset position.

Key Takeaways

It is the function and accepted for the I18N standard for designed SAS data.

The first occurrence of the string character is calculated and specified with the multi-varchar bytes.

So that it will process the find function in the multi-byte data.

Specified character, variables, constants, expressions, and other keywords.

The substring characters are calculated, and add the modifiers as optional parameters.

How to Use SAS Find?

In SAS, find function which helps to find the input strings for the first position and occurrence of the specified substring. It will return the substring position that cannot be found on the character string, substring, modifier, or start-position of the strings with optional arguments on the startpos of the Value. It helps to start the new search position of each character, and the same will be located in each direction from the right side. Suppose the start position of the string length is greater than the find position method to return the Value as an integer in 0.

But a lesser position of the strings will use to start the position in search strings and similar to directions for searching the left side of the strings, and it will compare to other position of the strings that is greater than the string length and starts the string yet to be completed of the string. It equals to return the 0 as the integer format and comparison of the Find function in every search character on each string whereas the FINDC function for searching the individual characters of every string. The find function of the string is calculated on each Index function for searching substrings of the character strings that do not use the modifier or first character string arguments.

find(variable,”string”,”i”)

Output:

Above code the find() method with the variable name, string and i. Here i denotes the parameter which helps to tell the SAS like ignoring the case for the specified input string which is followed by the parameter like “string” and sunstring. The index of the specified string character is printed on the output console.

SAS Find a Substring

We know that SAS find helps to find the character of the strings and their occurrence like that substring. The find function also checks and whether the given input string contains the specified characters or a combination of the input characters including the single character. It will operate the position of the input strings and also check the condition like whether the input string is substring or not. Finally, it will return the SAS input value as 0 in integer format.

The above screenshot helps to find the substring for the mentioned input strings here I used “and”.

Word for to find the position of the inputs and calculate each character and displayed the value in the variable.

Example of SAS Find

Given below is the example mentioned:

Code:

data August5; input inps $1-10; datalines; August is the current month September is the next month July is the previous month October is the next two month November and December is the next third and fourth month ; run; proc print data=August5; data August6; set August5; res1 = find(inps, "is","i"); run;

Output:

1. Above is the basic example for calculating and finding the string occurrence of the mentioned input strings.

2. Here first we declared the datasets on the first set.

3. Then after the creation of the dataset then we need to find the string characters of the input strings.

Here we mentioned the character is “is” along with “i” helps to ignore the cases.

Finally, we get the output result as below:

The is calculated for every occurrence of the inputs and the same will be printed on the variable output.

Frequently Asked Questions

Given below are the FAQ mentioned:

Q1. What is SAS find()?

Answer:

SAS find() is the function and helps to identify the string occurrence of the given inputs.

Q2. Mention the syntax of the SAS find().

Answer:

Find(variable, “string”, optional arguments or modifiers)

Here optional arguments or modifiers are used like “I, t,,”.

Q3. Define SAS substring in find().

Answer:

The Substring is like the character constant, variable, and expressions specified with the string characters.

Q4. How to find the specific string in SAS?

Answer:

Use find() function to find the position of the strings with required datasets and syntax.

Q5. How to find the character in SAS?

Answer:

With the help of the index function, the string characters are identified including special characters, letters, operators, etc.

Conclusion

The SAS find() is one of the pre-defined functions in SAS that helps to search the string characters, letters, etc. For to find the position of the string in each occurrence in various ways additionally include the index function to calculate the characters of each string in the datasets.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to SAS Find. Here we discuss the introduction, how to use and steps to create SAS find, example, and FAQ respectively. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

How To Create And Use Interactive Charts In Numbers

Creating a chart or graph in Numbers is a great way to display your data visually. And Numbers offers several different types so that you can use the best style to show your data. One of those types is an Interactive Chart.

An Interactive Chart in Numbers is convenient for displaying groups of data for comparison or changes over time. Your data stays intact, and you simply adjust the chart to show it differently.

If you haven’t tried this type of chart before, we’re here to help. Here’s how to create and use Interactive Charts in Numbers on both Mac and iOS.

Working with Interactive Charts in Numbers

Create an Interactive Chart on Mac

Like the other graphs and charts in Numbers, you can insert a blank chart and add your data to it later or select your data and then insert the chart to populate it. From experience, it’s easier to start with a data set, select it, and build your chart from there, and that’s what we’re going to do in this tutorial.

To easily see how an Interactive Chart can be beneficial, we’re going to use data for product sales over 12 months. This will let us use the chart to view each month’s sales, one month at a time.

1) Select your data set by dragging through the cells.

Tip: It’s good to use the Chart button in the toolbar here because you can see the options and color schemes rather than the menu bar option because that just gives you a list of Interactive Chart types.

3) Choose the type and color of Interactive Chart you want to use. You can pick from a column, bar, scatter, or bubble chart. And you have six color schemes for each, which you can still change later.

4) Your Interactive Chart will pop onto your sheet populated with the data set you selected in Step 1.

The key to an Interactive Chart is its name, it’s interactive. So you’ll notice at the bottom of the chart you have a slider and buttons. Using these controls, you can move through your data set displaying different groups or in our case, each month of the year.

You have the option to use a slider with buttons or buttons only to control your chart. These options can be found in the Format sidebar, which we’ll discuss next.

Format your Interactive Chart

There’s a healthy number of settings you can adjust in the sidebar like style, colors, controls, corners, gaps, background, border, and chart type.

Let’s take a look how we can change our column chart.

Just by changing things like the chart colors, font style, controls, corners, gaps, and adding a background and chart title, you can make your Interactive Chart look exactly as you want.

Adjust your data display

If you want to change the data that displays in the chart, for example, maybe you want to remove a certain series from the chart, this is simple.

You can also reverse the data. For instance, you can have the data from your rows and columns swapped using the Plot Rows/Columns as Series settings.

Create an Interactive Chart on iPhone and iPad

It can be a lot easier to work with charts on Mac, but if your only Apple device is an iPhone or iPad, not to worry! You can create an Interactive Chart on iOS and you have the same types of formatting options as macOS.

1) Open your sheet in Numbers on iPhone or iPad and tap the plus sign at the top.

2) Select the second tab for Charts and then choose Interactive.

3) Pick the style and color scheme for your chart and it will pop onto your sheet.

4) You should then see a blue Tap to Add Data button on the chart. Tap it, select your data set, and tap Done.

Format your Interactive Chart

To apply different formatting to your Interactive Chart, select it and then tap the Style button (brush icon) at the top.

You can then move between the Chart and Style tabs to adjust things like the color, controls, font, corners, gaps, and other elements.

Adjust your data display

To change the way your data set displays in the chart, you can do this one of two ways.

Select the chart and tap it. In the shortcut menu, use the arrow to move to the right until you see the Edit References and Edit Series choices.

Alternatively, you can select the chart and tap the Style button. Make sure the Chart tab is selected and then pick either Edit Series or Edit References.

When you finish making your changes, tap Done to apply them.

Wrapping it up

Interactive Charts in Numbers give you a unique and helpful way to display your data. So whether you’re viewing the chart for yourself or sharing it with others, it can be more useful than a static chart or graph.

Are you going to give the Interactive Charts in Numbers a try? If so, let us know!

Also, check out how to create basic charts and graphs in Keynote for your business presentations.

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