Trending March 2024 # Pixel 4 Confirmed With Soli For Face Unlock & Motion Sense # Suggested April 2024 # Top 6 Popular

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Pixel 4 confirmed with Soli for face unlock & Motion Sense

The Pixel 4 may still be months away from launching, but Google can’t stop previewing its Android flagship’s features – and confirming new and innovative hardware along the way. Recent rumors have focused on the possibility of Google including its motion-sensing Soli technology in the Pixel 4, and – just as it did with camera chatter – Google has now confirmed that will indeed be onboard, powering the phone’s Motion Sense feature.

Soli is the handiwork of the Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) team at Google, the group focused on cooking up new gadgetry and innovative designs that could one day make its way into production devices. In the case of Soli specifically, it builds on radar, packaging it into a form-factor small enough to fit into a phone or even a wearable.

For the Pixel 4, Soli will be responsible for Motion Sense. The sensor will be integrated into the upper bezel of the smartphone, tracking motions around the handset. It’ll mean you can skip songs by waving a hand, snooze alarms, and silence incoming calls. “These capabilities are just the start,” Google’s Brandon Barbello, product manager for Pixel, says, “and just as Pixels get better over time, Motion Sense will evolve as well. “

It’s not the only Pixel 4 feature that Google is confirming today. There’ll also be face unlock, something Google concedes is familiar from other smartphones on the market already, but which Barbello says the Pixel 4 will do differently.

“Other phones require you to lift the device all the way up, pose in a certain way, wait for it to unlock, and then swipe to get to the homescreen,” the product manager points out. “Pixel 4 does all of that in a much more streamlined way.”

So, Soli will be used to track when you’re reaching for the Pixel 4. That will then proactively turn on the face unlock sensors that are also integrated into the top bezel. It’ll cut down the wake time for the system, versus relying on the accelerometer to know when the phone is physically moving.

The promise is that the Pixel 4 face unlock will open as you pick the phone up, with no pause to wait for it to take place. It’ll also work regardless of the angle you’re holding the Pixel 4 at. Even if you’re holding it upside down, in fact.

Google will also allow Android to use face unlock for secure payments and app authentication. The facial recognition technology stores its data on the handset alone, rather than in the cloud, using the Titan M security chip. Soli data is also processed on-device, rather than being saved to the cloud or, indeed, shared with other Google services.

Gesture tracking on phones isn’t new: indeed, we saw LG try something along those lines earlier in the year, with the G8 ThinQ. The shortcoming typically is that the precision of the sensors – usually camera-based, or with a so-called Time of Flight (ToF) sensor – is underwhelming, forcing you to make over-exaggerated movements. We’ll see whether Soli bypasses that problem later in the year, with the Pixel 4 expected to debut in October 2023.

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Pixel 4 And 4 Xl Problems And How To Fix Them

David Imel / Android Authority

The Google Pixel 4 and 4 XL are excellent phones, particularly if you’re into smartphone photography. Unfortunately, they also have their fair share of problems that need to be addressed. Running into problems with your new device? Here’s a roundup of some common Google Pixel 4 and 4 XL problems and their fixes!

Editor’s note: We will continue to update this list of common problems Pixel 4 and 4 XL owners face. Keep in mind that not every device will have these issues. In fact, it is more than likely that you won’t come across these problems at all.

You can also go through standard bug fixing procedures. Clear app data and cache, uninstall and reinstall the Google app, and delete and redo Voice Match. If all else fails, a factory reset (you can find out how to do so below) may be an option.

While the steps above have worked for some users, quite a few have reported that the issue still persists. Google is aware of this bug and a software update will hopefully address it.

2. Wired headphones not working with the phone

Some users are having trouble using wired headphones with the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL. The phone doesn’t recognize the connected device and continues to play music through its speakers.

Potential solutions:

This issue is most likely caused because of compatibility issues with third-party USB-C to 3.5mm adapters. You will need an adapter that is a DAC (digital to analog converter). While the Pixel 4 doesn’t come with an adapter in the box, the official Google adapter is still the best way to go if you’re looking for one.

Of course, make sure that there aren’t any problems with the headphones first. Use it with other phones and laptops to ensure that it’s working as expected.

You could also try cleaning the USB-C port. Turn the phone off and use a soft toothbrush or a wooden toothpick to clean out any lint or other build-up. You can also use compressed air as long as the intensity isn’t too high.

A soft reboot has also worked for some users. However, the problem goes away only temporarily in most cases.

The best solution to this problem isn’t ideal but has worked for most. Simply factory resetting the phone seems to do the trick. Make sure that you back up all important data and media before doing so because the phone will be erased completely.

4. Problems where the only option is to wait for a software update

There are some issues that don’t have a workaround just yet. However, a lot of them are software problems that will likely be fixed with an upcoming update.

Sensors not working: Many users find that the sensors of the Pixel 4 and 4 XL randomly stop working. This directly affects features like auto-rotate, active edge, tap to wake, and more. This is a well-documented problem that Google is aware of. The March software update has fixed it for some users but many are still facing the issue.

Visual Voicemail not working: Some users are not able to use Visual Voicemail as expected. It’s still not clear if this is an issue with the phone or with the network carrier. Either way, an update is the only thing that will address it.

Issues with WPA3: Many Wi-Fi routers and access points now support WPA3. Unfortunately, Pixel 4 and 4 XL owners are facing frequent disconnections when connecting to the network. More often than not, users also have to enter credentials again when attempting to reconnect.

5. Problems where the only option is to get a replacement

If you run into any hardware issues, the only option available is to pick up a replacement.

Display issues: Pixel smartphones haven’t had the best track record and some of the most common Pixel 4 and 4 XL problems have to do with the screen. Some users are seeing grey and pink splotches on dark and black backgrounds. However, this shouldn’t be mistaken with the grey glow seen at the top of the screen when the Soli system is activated to sense gestures.

Mic issues: A few users are facing an issue where the mic stops working completely. For most, the problem seems to be because of a case. If so, simply removing the case does the trick. However, if the problem persists, or you don’t use a case, the only option is to get it replaced.

Battery stuck at 50%: A lot of people have run into an issue where the phone doesn’t charge beyond 50%. Some users have found that the phone randomly powers off as well. Unfortunately, this seems to be a hardware problem, and the only option is to get your phone replaced.

Wireless charging not working: Some users are reporting problems with wireless charging on their Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL. This is a hardware issue and it seems like a connector is breaking. In more extreme cases, users are reporting swollen batteries. You can check if it’s the latter by seeing if there is a gap between the sides and the rear glass panel. In either case, your only option is to pick up a replacement.

7. Guide — How to factory reset the Pixel 4 and 4 XL

Resetting the phone to factory settings is often a last-ditch solution to fix some problems that users come across on their phones. However, don’t forget to back up important data, files, and media because this process will erase everything.

Reset with the phone on

Go to “Settings.”

Tap “Erase all data (factory reset)”  and then “Reset phone.”

You may have to enter your PIN, pattern, or password.

Tap on “Erase everything.”

Reset with the phone off or if it’s unresponsive

Press and hold the power and volume down buttons simultaneously until Fastboot mode (image of a triangle with an exclamation point) appears.

If you see “No command” on the screen, press and hold the power button. While holding the power button, press the volume up button and release both.

Select “Recovery mode” by navigating the list with the volume up and down keys. Use the power button to select the option.

In the Recovery menu, use the volume keys to go down to “Wipe data/factory reset.”

Select “Factory reset” in the next menu.

Once complete, select “Reboot system now.”

Galaxy S Ii Confirmed With 1.2Ghz Dual

South Korean mobile phone maker Samsung is getting ready for the launch of a new, highly appealing smartphone on the market before the end of the month, namely the Samsung Galaxy S II, and the company reportedly confirmed one of the much discussed features of the device, its 1.2GHz application processor. For those out of the loop, we should note that recent reports on the handset suggested that Samsung might have bumped its processor from 1GHz up to 1.2GHz. This would result in increased performance capabilities, and would make the device even more appealing that it might have been before. All these reports have been recently confirmed by Samsung themselves, TechRadar notes in a recent article. At least in the UK, the smartphone would arrive on shelves with the faster 1.2GHz application processor, Samsung said, though it did not specified which chip that would be. Previously, the Galaxy S II was said to land on shelves in two flavors, one with Samsung’s own dual-core processor inside, and another one powered by Nvidia’s Tegra 2 chip. As stated above, the mobile phone is expected to arrive on shelves starting with late April, and should be gradually rolled-out to various markets around the world. It was initially said to come earlier on the market, but the processor speed bump reportedly determined Samsung to delay its launch. The Galaxy S II arrives on shelves with Google’s Android 2.3 Gingerbread operating system on board, and packs a large, 4.3-inch touchscreen display, along with 16GB of internal memory. Moreover, it sports an 8-megapixel photo snapper on the back, with flash, auto-focus and HD video recording capabilities, as well as a front-facing camera for video calling. The handset’s specifications list also includes 3G, WiFi, and Bluetooth connectivity, along with built-in GPS receiver, and support for various Google Mobile Services, and applications available for download via the Android Market.

South Korean mobile phone maker Samsung is getting ready for the launch of a new, highly appealing smartphone on the market before the end of the month, namely the Samsung Galaxy S II, and the company reportedly confirmed one of the much discussed features of the device, its 1.2GHz application processor. For those out of the loop, we should note that recent reports on the handset suggested that Samsung might have bumped its processor from 1GHz up to 1.2GHz. This would result in increased performance capabilities, and would make the device even more appealing that it might have been before. All these reports have been recently confirmed by Samsung themselves, TechRadar notes in a recent article. At least in the UK, the smartphone would arrive on shelves with the faster 1.2GHz application processor, Samsung said, though it did not specified which chip that would be. Previously, the Galaxy S II was said to land on shelves in two flavors, one with Samsung’s own dual-core processor inside, and another one powered by Nvidia’s Tegra 2 chip. As stated above, the mobile phone is expected to arrive on shelves starting with late April, and should be gradually rolled-out to various markets around the world. It was initially said to come earlier on the market, but the processor speed bump reportedly determined Samsung to delay its launch. The Galaxy S II arrives on shelves with Google’s Android 2.3 Gingerbread operating system on board, and packs a large, 4.3-inch touchscreen display, along with 16GB of internal memory. Moreover, it sports an 8-megapixel photo snapper on the back, with flash, auto-focus and HD video recording capabilities, as well as a front-facing camera for video calling. The handset’s specifications list also includes 3G, WiFi, and Bluetooth connectivity, along with built-in GPS receiver, and support for various Google Mobile Services, and applications available for download via the Android Market.

Google Pixel And Pixel Xl Launched – Good Enough For The Price?

Google Pixel and Pixel XL Specs

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The Google Pixel and the Pixel XL are extremely similar phones. They share almost everything in terms of the hardware, except for the display and battery size. Google has emulated the iPhone strategy to a great extent here, from the design, specs to the pricing too. We’ll come back to the pricing later, but here’s a quick glance at the specs.

The Google Pixel comes with a 5 inch AMOLED display with a full HD resolution, resulting in a pixel density of ~441 PPI. The Pixel XL comes with a 5.5 inch Quad HD AMOLED display with a pixel density of ~534 PPI.

Google has talked a lot about the cameras in the new Pixels. Both the phones come with the same 12 MP camera with an f/2.0 aperture and Phase Detection Autofocus. The phones come with dual LED flash for assistance in low light. Video recording up to 2160p at 30 FPS is supported. On the front, you get an 8 MP snapper.

The more interesting bits about the cameras are in the software department. Google has been working over the last few months to optimize the new Pixels. To demonstrate this, the company showed off a side-by-side video recording with two Pixels – one with stabilisation enabled and the other with stabilisation disabled. The difference, in the keynote video, was staggering. How it performs in real life remains to be seen.

Coming to other specs, the new Pixel and Pixel XL come with 4 GB RAM, 32 GB or 128 GB UFS 2.0 internal storage. There is no option to expand the internal storage with a microSD card.

Google Pixel And Pixel XL FAQ, User Queries And Answers

Question: Do the Google Pixel and Pixel XL have dual SIM Slots?

Answer: No, the Pixel phones do not come with dual SIM slots. You get a single SIM slot with support for a nano SIM card.

Answer: No, the devices do not support microSD expansion.

Question: What are the color options?

Answer: The devices will be available in Blue, Silver and Black color options.

Answer: Yes, the devices come with a 3.5 mm audio jack.

Question: What all sensor do the Pixel and Pixel XL have?

Answer: The new Pixel phones come with fingerprint sensor, accelerometer, gyro, proxity sensor, compass and a barometer.

Google Pixel XL – 154.7 x 75.7 x 8.6 mm

Question: What is the SoC used in the Pixel and Pixel XL?

Answer: Both the Pixel and Pixel XL come with Qualcomm Snapdragon 821.

Answer: The Google Pixel comes with a 5 inch full HD AMOLED display. It has a pixel density of ~441 ppi.

The Pixel XL comes with a 5.5 inch Quad HD AMOLED display. It has a pixel density of ~534 PPI.

Question: Do the Google Pixel and Pixel XL support Adaptive Brightness?

Question: Which OS version, OS type runs on the phone?

Answer: Both the devices run on Android 7.1 Nougat.

Question: Do the new Pixel phones come with capacitive buttons or on-screen navigation buttons?

Answer: Both the devices come with on-screen navigation buttons.

Answer: Yes, both the phones come with a fingerprint sensor.

Question: Can we Play 4K Videos on the Google Pixel and Pixel XL?

Answer: The Google Pixel can only play videos up to full HD resolution whereas the Google Pixel XL can play videos up to 2K resolution.

Question: Is Fast Charging supported on the Google Pixel and Pixel XL?

Question: Do they support USB OTG?

Answer: Yes, they both support USB OTG.

Question: Do they come with a Gyroscope sensor?

Answer: Yes, they come with a gyroscope sensor.

Answer: No, the devices are not waterproof.

Question: Do they have NFC?

Answer: Yes, the devices come with NFC.

Question: How good is the camera quality of the Google Pixel and Pixel XL?

We haven’t tested the new Pixel phones yet. Once we have done our testing, we will post more details in the review.

Question: Do they have Optical Image Stabilization (OIS)?

Answer: No, the devices do not come with OIS.

Question: Is there any dedicated camera shutter button on the new Pixel phones?

Question: What is the weight of the Google Pixel and Pixel XL?

Google Pixel XL – 168 gms

Question: Do the Pixel phones come with stereo loudspeaker?

Answer: The Pixel phones come with a single loudspeaker, downward firing. They do not come with stereo loudspeakers.

Question: Is Mobile Hotspot Internet Sharing supported?

Answer: Yes, you can create hotspot to share internet from the Pixel phones to other devices.

Conclusion

The new Google Pixel and Pixel XL demonstrate that Google is stepping up its game, at least on paper. Both the phones come with the latest specs, stock Android software with a brand new Google Assistant. However, they don’t offer anything drastically different from any other phone out there. Perhaps companies like Samsung and others have innovated a lot more in both the design of the hardware as well as new software features than Google has in the new Pixel phones.

Night Mode Versus Night Sight: Macworld Test Says Iphone 11 Beats Pixel 4

When Apple announced the low-light photography capabilities of the iPhone 11, everyone was eagerly awaiting a new Night mode versus Night Sight test, aka Apple against Google.

PC World conducted one back in September, but that was against the Pixel 3 – the smartphone originally crowned the king of low-light photography. There were objections then that it was comparing different generations of smartphone tech, but it seems the position hasn’t changed now that the Pixel 4 is out…

PCWorld’s Michael Simon said in September that the iPhone 11 blew the Pixel 3 out of the water.

I’m simply blown away by what Apple has accomplished with Night Mode on the iPhone 11. When I first tried Night Sight on the Pixel 3 last October, I couldn’t believe what Google was able to do with its AI and processing. In no uncertain terms, Apple’s Night Mode makes Night Sight look amateurish.

MacWorld has now tested the iPhone 11 against the latest Pixel 4 and says that – so far, at least – it’s still, well, night and day.

We still have some more testing to go before we can reach a verdict on Google’s new Pixel 4 smartphone, but early results continue to show that it’s in for a big fight with the iPhone 11. We tested the improved Night Sight against the iPhone 11’s Night mode to see which camera could snap a better nighttime shot and the results are quite one-sided.

That’s very surprising. Apple’s Night Mode was largely seen as playing catch-up to Google’s version on the Pixel 3, and we all assumed that the Pixel 4 would take another leap to show Apple who’s boss. That might not be the case. In shot after shot, the iPhone 11 didn’t just turn extremely dark images into useable pics—it brightened the right spots, retained the right shadows, and simply handled the whole scene better than the Pixel 4. It’s subtle, but more often than not, the iPhone produced richer, more detailed shots without losing the natural darkness.

The site says that sometimes the iPhone 11 did an objectively better job, as in a city street shot.

Both cameras were able to illuminate the scene enough to see the whole building from a distance. However, Google blew out colors and lost much of the definition and shadows, while the iPhone 11 retained the integrity of the night and illuminated the parts that were shrouded in darkness.

The same was true of another street shot, where the iPhone had much better color accuracy. An indoor shot with the lights off was no contest (iPhone 11 right):

The Pixel (left) did win with this shot:

I found a situation where the Pixel 4’s all-over brightening is superior to Apple’s measured approach. The fog here is picked up much better by the Pixel 4 and appropriately spooky, while it’s practically invisible in the iPhone 11’s shot. I do think the iPhone 11 did a better job with the pumpkin’s shadows—and check out the inside detail in the left eye, but overall, I prefer the Pixel here.

I would query the significantly different framing in the city street shot at the top, as that could easily impact exposure and processing, but most other shots have near-identical framing.

There’s more testing to come, but so far, writes Simon, the iPhone 11 is the new king of the night. Check out the complete set of comparison shots over at MacWorld.

My own conclusion so far is that Night mode doesn’t meet the high bar needed to act as a travel camera, but does a fantastic job at social photography.

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All These Pixel Watch Updates Are Hyping Me Up For The Pixel Watch 2

Rita El Khoury / Android Authority

If you asked me eight months ago where I pictured the Pixel Watch would be by now, I’d have named dozens and dozens of updates and new features I wanted, on top of obvious additions like more watch faces. Alas, the first six months of the watch’s existence were pretty boring, update-wise, so much so that I started wondering if Google had abandoned the project soon after it launched it. Hey, all we got was fall detection plus a couple of random features for six months!

But the pace of Pixel Watch updates was greatly accelerated about a month ago. We started seeing new apps and functions as well as better third-party developer support, until it all culminated with an important quarterly feature drop in June. All of this may be a bit late for Google’s first-gen smartwatch, but it’s getting me hyped up for the Pixel Watch 2.

Updated health and activity tracking on the Pixel Watch

We were all baffled when the Pixel Watch launched with a deactivated SpO2 sensor. The latest update has finally activated it and now my watch tracks my oxygen saturation at night and shows me the result every day for extra peace of mind.

High and low heart rate warnings also made it to the Pixel Watch with the latest feature drop, though I haven’t seen any of them yet — I suppose that’s a good thing! I hope I never need that feature, but at least I know the watch will ping me should things go haywire at some point for no reason.

Google also supposedly added automatic detection for pauses and resuming during exercise tracking, but that didn’t work during my outdoor walk last Saturday. I waited a couple of minutes for the watch to catch up and realize I’d sat down and when it didn’t, I manually paused tracking. It didn’t automatically resume when I got back up and finished my walk, so I had to manually trigger it too. The reason, I later discovered, is that you have to manually enable Auto Pause in the Exercise app on the watch, for each exercise type.

New and essential health and activity tracking features have finally made it to the Pixel Watch.

Now that I’ve turned this option on, I’m excited about it. I’ve taken a few hikes and outdoor walks and often forgotten to pause tracking during rests, which consumes battery and messes up the stats. Or worse, I forgot to resume after pausing. I’d still like the Pixel Watch to automatically recognize and live-track exercises like other Fitbit trackers, but this is a step in the right direction.

… but things are on the right path for the Pixel Watch 2

Rita El Khoury / Android Authority

If recent rumors are to be believed, the Pixel Watch 2 would launch alongside the upcoming Pixel 8 and 8 Pro in October and will feature an upgraded Snapdragon W5 series chip. Unlike the current Exynos processor, the W5 series is built specifically for smartwatches and promises to improve performance and — most importantly — battery life. That’s the biggest letdown we mentioned in our Pixel Watch review so I’d count it as a win if the second-generation watch can reach two days with always-on activated and a little more with it off.

Maybe it’s a little too late for the first Pixel Watch, but things are looking up for the Pixel Watch 2.

Additionally, Wear OS 4 is supposedly coming later this year with Material You colors and an easier backup and reset process for smartwatches. Add this to all of the features that have already been implemented and the Pixel Watch 2 is certainly looking more enticing than Google’s first effort. Ideally, I’d also like a larger size option, automatic live exercise tracking, and a temperature sensor for better female health tracking, but the glacial pace of updates is forcing me to temper my expectations.

Even though Samsung and Apple are still far ahead, I can’t use either of their watches because I’ve been wearing a Fitbit for the last decade and all my data is there. The Pixel Watch is my only option. I’d really like to see it succeed, and after months of questioning, I’m happy to see things move in the right direction.

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